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Dump the Junk With These Barbecue Treats That Still Carry Plenty of Pop

Dump the Junk With These Barbecue Treats That Still Carry Plenty of Pop

Those summer barbecue staples — buns, potato chips, alcohol and burgers — don't have to leave you feeling stuffed and bloated. Here are some ways to add healthful offerings to the table while keeping backyard gatherings festive.

Skinnier, more healthful buns

The slender One Bun Multi Grain Thin Sandwich Buns from Ozery Bakery are a more-nutritious option to regular white hamburger buns, with ingredients such as crushed flax seed, cracked wheat, millet meal and sunflower seeds. Despite their skinnier dimensions, they're capable of holding a patty with all the trappings.

"We took the whole grain ingredients we love and worked with a flavor profile that is a combination of taste and health," said Guy Ozery, co-owner of the Toronto-based Ozery Bakery. "And the thin slices make whatever is in between the star."

Info: $3.99 at Sprouts Farmers Market, Whole Foods Market, ozerybakery.com

Vegan burgers that pack a punch

For the vegan/vegetarian at your backyard shindig: Qrunch Organics makes a quinoa-and-millet burger patty with onion, broccoli, spinach and carrots that is also gluten-free. Heather Collins, the Denver-based company's director of marketing and communications, said the burgers are "a blank canvas....add your favorite topping (for) a plant-based product that is easy to make."

Throw on the grill like anything else, or pop in the oven. The Qrunch burger comes in Original, Spicy Italian, Green Chili and Saucy Buffalo-Style flavors, at 100 to 140 calories per patty.

Info: $4.99 per box of four, at Sprouts Farmers Markets, Whole Foods Market and Gelson's, qrunchfoods.com


13 simple changes that lead to huge weight loss

Like lint on a black sweater, unhealthy foods and snacks can accumulate in your home without you realizing it.

Pie from the church bake sale, caramel popcorn from the Boy Scouts, a pork-kraut roll from Mom. And before you know it, you’re shoveling it into your mouth. Start the workweek fresh by taking a few minutes to rid your kitchen of crap and shake the airline stroopwafels out of your briefcase.

“It’s amazing how much food can creep in,” Hassink said. If you don’t have the heart to toss Mom’s signature dish, just divide it into smaller portions to freeze and reheat later. And don’t get doggie bags at restaurants anymore — unless they’re actually for your dog. Matt Rourke Show More Show Less

2 of 20 2. Trim down your social media “feed.”

Facebook could also be insidiously filling you out. If certain friends and family members are constantly sharing food videos and decadent recipes, their posts could be fattening up your space.

“How much time are you spending on those posts? Take notice if you find yourself getting hungry just looking at them,” Hassink said.

If you are, then hide, snooze or unfollow the worst offenders. Likewise, trade all those craft breweries and barbecue joints you follow for sites that deliver positive reinforcement, like healthy eating accounts.

4 of 20 3. Tweak your grocery list.

A common belief is that eating healthy costs a lot. Not true, says Dr. Adam Drewnowski, director of the University of Washington Center for Public Health Nutrition.

Research shows that the healthiest diets — ones rich in fruits, vegetables, fish and nuts — cost only $1.56 more per day (that’s $10.92 per week) than the least healthy diets — processed foods and meats, refined grains.

In fact, stocking your world with nutritious choices needn’t cost anything extra. Swap the 10 bucks you’re currently dropping on cold cuts, bread and chips for a pound of fresh strawberries ($3.99), an avocado ($1.50), a bag of romaine ($2.60) and two single-serving containers of Greek yogurt ($1 each).

Drewnowski calls this an “economic intervention,” a conscious spending of $1.56 a day on healthy foods instead of fattening, carb-filled ones that will pay off with gradual weight loss. Show More Show Less

4. Declare war on one junk food each month.

5. When traveling, book a room in a pedestrian-friendly part of town.

Whether you’re on the road for business or vacation, you’ll get more exercise and burn more calories if you skip the car rental and stay in a hotel or Airbnb in the center of town, where you can safely walk everywhere.

6. Call the hotel help desk.

7. Renting a car? Go compact.

8. Never let your fridge become empty.

9. Change your commute.

If you often succumb to temptation and stop for, say, a Grande Caffè Mocha at Starbucks on your way to work, consider changing your route. That drink, even when made with 2% milk, has 360 calories, 15 grams of fat, 44 grams of carbs and 35 grams of sugar.

Add a blueberry muffin and you’ve just turned breakfast into a gut bomb. Keeping your kryptonite out of sight will make it less convenient to pull in and indulge there.

Yi-Chin Lee, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

10. Make sure you’re safe at this dangerous time.

Specifically, the hour or two after work ends and before dinner begins is a weak spot for many, said Simon. Make sure you’re nowhere near a happy hour with free appetizers or an ice cream stand with a drive-thru during these times. Stash your favorite protein bar in your car or purse in case of emergency.

11. Parental-control yourself.

12. Find a “safety” restaurant.

13. Manage the candy stash.

To keep from filching Easter baskets or Halloween treats, buy candy just one day before the holiday. Buy only as much as needed, and then immediately get rid of leftovers. The less time sweets linger in the house, the less likely you’ll be to eat them.

And above all, never volunteer to be the parent who loans their garage to the Girl Scout troop for cookie storage. No one needs a literal garage of temptation.

Dr. Sandra Hassink has been studying childhood obesity for more than 30 years. And the most important thing she&rsquos learned &mdash applicable to kids and grown-ups alike &mdash is this: &ldquoAll the willpower in the world,&rdquo she says, &ldquocan&rsquot overcome an obesogenic environment."

In other words, to lose weight and keep it off, you have to adjust your world so it&rsquos not constantly tempting you. Instead of putting yourself on a diet, put your environment on one.

&ldquoYou can&rsquot make good health decisions if your environment is always working against you, because then you have to be on alert 24-7,&rdquo said Hassink, founder of the Nemours Weight Management Clinic in Wilmington, Delaware. &ldquoYou get tired. Things come up. It&rsquos hard to without creating a healthy environment in the first place.&rdquo

With the help of Hassink and other weight management experts, let&rsquos start fat-proofing your world.

STAY IN THE KNOW: Get caught up on what's going on around Houston. From sports to news and entertainment, check out the newsletters we're offering.


13 simple changes that lead to huge weight loss

Like lint on a black sweater, unhealthy foods and snacks can accumulate in your home without you realizing it.

Pie from the church bake sale, caramel popcorn from the Boy Scouts, a pork-kraut roll from Mom. And before you know it, you’re shoveling it into your mouth. Start the workweek fresh by taking a few minutes to rid your kitchen of crap and shake the airline stroopwafels out of your briefcase.

“It’s amazing how much food can creep in,” Hassink said. If you don’t have the heart to toss Mom’s signature dish, just divide it into smaller portions to freeze and reheat later. And don’t get doggie bags at restaurants anymore — unless they’re actually for your dog. Matt Rourke Show More Show Less

2 of 20 2. Trim down your social media “feed.”

Facebook could also be insidiously filling you out. If certain friends and family members are constantly sharing food videos and decadent recipes, their posts could be fattening up your space.

“How much time are you spending on those posts? Take notice if you find yourself getting hungry just looking at them,” Hassink said.

If you are, then hide, snooze or unfollow the worst offenders. Likewise, trade all those craft breweries and barbecue joints you follow for sites that deliver positive reinforcement, like healthy eating accounts.

4 of 20 3. Tweak your grocery list.

A common belief is that eating healthy costs a lot. Not true, says Dr. Adam Drewnowski, director of the University of Washington Center for Public Health Nutrition.

Research shows that the healthiest diets — ones rich in fruits, vegetables, fish and nuts — cost only $1.56 more per day (that’s $10.92 per week) than the least healthy diets — processed foods and meats, refined grains.

In fact, stocking your world with nutritious choices needn’t cost anything extra. Swap the 10 bucks you’re currently dropping on cold cuts, bread and chips for a pound of fresh strawberries ($3.99), an avocado ($1.50), a bag of romaine ($2.60) and two single-serving containers of Greek yogurt ($1 each).

Drewnowski calls this an “economic intervention,” a conscious spending of $1.56 a day on healthy foods instead of fattening, carb-filled ones that will pay off with gradual weight loss. Show More Show Less

4. Declare war on one junk food each month.

5. When traveling, book a room in a pedestrian-friendly part of town.

Whether you’re on the road for business or vacation, you’ll get more exercise and burn more calories if you skip the car rental and stay in a hotel or Airbnb in the center of town, where you can safely walk everywhere.

6. Call the hotel help desk.

7. Renting a car? Go compact.

8. Never let your fridge become empty.

9. Change your commute.

If you often succumb to temptation and stop for, say, a Grande Caffè Mocha at Starbucks on your way to work, consider changing your route. That drink, even when made with 2% milk, has 360 calories, 15 grams of fat, 44 grams of carbs and 35 grams of sugar.

Add a blueberry muffin and you’ve just turned breakfast into a gut bomb. Keeping your kryptonite out of sight will make it less convenient to pull in and indulge there.

Yi-Chin Lee, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

10. Make sure you’re safe at this dangerous time.

Specifically, the hour or two after work ends and before dinner begins is a weak spot for many, said Simon. Make sure you’re nowhere near a happy hour with free appetizers or an ice cream stand with a drive-thru during these times. Stash your favorite protein bar in your car or purse in case of emergency.

11. Parental-control yourself.

12. Find a “safety” restaurant.

13. Manage the candy stash.

To keep from filching Easter baskets or Halloween treats, buy candy just one day before the holiday. Buy only as much as needed, and then immediately get rid of leftovers. The less time sweets linger in the house, the less likely you’ll be to eat them.

And above all, never volunteer to be the parent who loans their garage to the Girl Scout troop for cookie storage. No one needs a literal garage of temptation.

Dr. Sandra Hassink has been studying childhood obesity for more than 30 years. And the most important thing she&rsquos learned &mdash applicable to kids and grown-ups alike &mdash is this: &ldquoAll the willpower in the world,&rdquo she says, &ldquocan&rsquot overcome an obesogenic environment."

In other words, to lose weight and keep it off, you have to adjust your world so it&rsquos not constantly tempting you. Instead of putting yourself on a diet, put your environment on one.

&ldquoYou can&rsquot make good health decisions if your environment is always working against you, because then you have to be on alert 24-7,&rdquo said Hassink, founder of the Nemours Weight Management Clinic in Wilmington, Delaware. &ldquoYou get tired. Things come up. It&rsquos hard to without creating a healthy environment in the first place.&rdquo

With the help of Hassink and other weight management experts, let&rsquos start fat-proofing your world.

STAY IN THE KNOW: Get caught up on what's going on around Houston. From sports to news and entertainment, check out the newsletters we're offering.


13 simple changes that lead to huge weight loss

Like lint on a black sweater, unhealthy foods and snacks can accumulate in your home without you realizing it.

Pie from the church bake sale, caramel popcorn from the Boy Scouts, a pork-kraut roll from Mom. And before you know it, you’re shoveling it into your mouth. Start the workweek fresh by taking a few minutes to rid your kitchen of crap and shake the airline stroopwafels out of your briefcase.

“It’s amazing how much food can creep in,” Hassink said. If you don’t have the heart to toss Mom’s signature dish, just divide it into smaller portions to freeze and reheat later. And don’t get doggie bags at restaurants anymore — unless they’re actually for your dog. Matt Rourke Show More Show Less

2 of 20 2. Trim down your social media “feed.”

Facebook could also be insidiously filling you out. If certain friends and family members are constantly sharing food videos and decadent recipes, their posts could be fattening up your space.

“How much time are you spending on those posts? Take notice if you find yourself getting hungry just looking at them,” Hassink said.

If you are, then hide, snooze or unfollow the worst offenders. Likewise, trade all those craft breweries and barbecue joints you follow for sites that deliver positive reinforcement, like healthy eating accounts.

4 of 20 3. Tweak your grocery list.

A common belief is that eating healthy costs a lot. Not true, says Dr. Adam Drewnowski, director of the University of Washington Center for Public Health Nutrition.

Research shows that the healthiest diets — ones rich in fruits, vegetables, fish and nuts — cost only $1.56 more per day (that’s $10.92 per week) than the least healthy diets — processed foods and meats, refined grains.

In fact, stocking your world with nutritious choices needn’t cost anything extra. Swap the 10 bucks you’re currently dropping on cold cuts, bread and chips for a pound of fresh strawberries ($3.99), an avocado ($1.50), a bag of romaine ($2.60) and two single-serving containers of Greek yogurt ($1 each).

Drewnowski calls this an “economic intervention,” a conscious spending of $1.56 a day on healthy foods instead of fattening, carb-filled ones that will pay off with gradual weight loss. Show More Show Less

4. Declare war on one junk food each month.

5. When traveling, book a room in a pedestrian-friendly part of town.

Whether you’re on the road for business or vacation, you’ll get more exercise and burn more calories if you skip the car rental and stay in a hotel or Airbnb in the center of town, where you can safely walk everywhere.

6. Call the hotel help desk.

7. Renting a car? Go compact.

8. Never let your fridge become empty.

9. Change your commute.

If you often succumb to temptation and stop for, say, a Grande Caffè Mocha at Starbucks on your way to work, consider changing your route. That drink, even when made with 2% milk, has 360 calories, 15 grams of fat, 44 grams of carbs and 35 grams of sugar.

Add a blueberry muffin and you’ve just turned breakfast into a gut bomb. Keeping your kryptonite out of sight will make it less convenient to pull in and indulge there.

Yi-Chin Lee, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

10. Make sure you’re safe at this dangerous time.

Specifically, the hour or two after work ends and before dinner begins is a weak spot for many, said Simon. Make sure you’re nowhere near a happy hour with free appetizers or an ice cream stand with a drive-thru during these times. Stash your favorite protein bar in your car or purse in case of emergency.

11. Parental-control yourself.

12. Find a “safety” restaurant.

13. Manage the candy stash.

To keep from filching Easter baskets or Halloween treats, buy candy just one day before the holiday. Buy only as much as needed, and then immediately get rid of leftovers. The less time sweets linger in the house, the less likely you’ll be to eat them.

And above all, never volunteer to be the parent who loans their garage to the Girl Scout troop for cookie storage. No one needs a literal garage of temptation.

Dr. Sandra Hassink has been studying childhood obesity for more than 30 years. And the most important thing she&rsquos learned &mdash applicable to kids and grown-ups alike &mdash is this: &ldquoAll the willpower in the world,&rdquo she says, &ldquocan&rsquot overcome an obesogenic environment."

In other words, to lose weight and keep it off, you have to adjust your world so it&rsquos not constantly tempting you. Instead of putting yourself on a diet, put your environment on one.

&ldquoYou can&rsquot make good health decisions if your environment is always working against you, because then you have to be on alert 24-7,&rdquo said Hassink, founder of the Nemours Weight Management Clinic in Wilmington, Delaware. &ldquoYou get tired. Things come up. It&rsquos hard to without creating a healthy environment in the first place.&rdquo

With the help of Hassink and other weight management experts, let&rsquos start fat-proofing your world.

STAY IN THE KNOW: Get caught up on what's going on around Houston. From sports to news and entertainment, check out the newsletters we're offering.


13 simple changes that lead to huge weight loss

Like lint on a black sweater, unhealthy foods and snacks can accumulate in your home without you realizing it.

Pie from the church bake sale, caramel popcorn from the Boy Scouts, a pork-kraut roll from Mom. And before you know it, you’re shoveling it into your mouth. Start the workweek fresh by taking a few minutes to rid your kitchen of crap and shake the airline stroopwafels out of your briefcase.

“It’s amazing how much food can creep in,” Hassink said. If you don’t have the heart to toss Mom’s signature dish, just divide it into smaller portions to freeze and reheat later. And don’t get doggie bags at restaurants anymore — unless they’re actually for your dog. Matt Rourke Show More Show Less

2 of 20 2. Trim down your social media “feed.”

Facebook could also be insidiously filling you out. If certain friends and family members are constantly sharing food videos and decadent recipes, their posts could be fattening up your space.

“How much time are you spending on those posts? Take notice if you find yourself getting hungry just looking at them,” Hassink said.

If you are, then hide, snooze or unfollow the worst offenders. Likewise, trade all those craft breweries and barbecue joints you follow for sites that deliver positive reinforcement, like healthy eating accounts.

4 of 20 3. Tweak your grocery list.

A common belief is that eating healthy costs a lot. Not true, says Dr. Adam Drewnowski, director of the University of Washington Center for Public Health Nutrition.

Research shows that the healthiest diets — ones rich in fruits, vegetables, fish and nuts — cost only $1.56 more per day (that’s $10.92 per week) than the least healthy diets — processed foods and meats, refined grains.

In fact, stocking your world with nutritious choices needn’t cost anything extra. Swap the 10 bucks you’re currently dropping on cold cuts, bread and chips for a pound of fresh strawberries ($3.99), an avocado ($1.50), a bag of romaine ($2.60) and two single-serving containers of Greek yogurt ($1 each).

Drewnowski calls this an “economic intervention,” a conscious spending of $1.56 a day on healthy foods instead of fattening, carb-filled ones that will pay off with gradual weight loss. Show More Show Less

4. Declare war on one junk food each month.

5. When traveling, book a room in a pedestrian-friendly part of town.

Whether you’re on the road for business or vacation, you’ll get more exercise and burn more calories if you skip the car rental and stay in a hotel or Airbnb in the center of town, where you can safely walk everywhere.

6. Call the hotel help desk.

7. Renting a car? Go compact.

8. Never let your fridge become empty.

9. Change your commute.

If you often succumb to temptation and stop for, say, a Grande Caffè Mocha at Starbucks on your way to work, consider changing your route. That drink, even when made with 2% milk, has 360 calories, 15 grams of fat, 44 grams of carbs and 35 grams of sugar.

Add a blueberry muffin and you’ve just turned breakfast into a gut bomb. Keeping your kryptonite out of sight will make it less convenient to pull in and indulge there.

Yi-Chin Lee, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

10. Make sure you’re safe at this dangerous time.

Specifically, the hour or two after work ends and before dinner begins is a weak spot for many, said Simon. Make sure you’re nowhere near a happy hour with free appetizers or an ice cream stand with a drive-thru during these times. Stash your favorite protein bar in your car or purse in case of emergency.

11. Parental-control yourself.

12. Find a “safety” restaurant.

13. Manage the candy stash.

To keep from filching Easter baskets or Halloween treats, buy candy just one day before the holiday. Buy only as much as needed, and then immediately get rid of leftovers. The less time sweets linger in the house, the less likely you’ll be to eat them.

And above all, never volunteer to be the parent who loans their garage to the Girl Scout troop for cookie storage. No one needs a literal garage of temptation.

Dr. Sandra Hassink has been studying childhood obesity for more than 30 years. And the most important thing she&rsquos learned &mdash applicable to kids and grown-ups alike &mdash is this: &ldquoAll the willpower in the world,&rdquo she says, &ldquocan&rsquot overcome an obesogenic environment."

In other words, to lose weight and keep it off, you have to adjust your world so it&rsquos not constantly tempting you. Instead of putting yourself on a diet, put your environment on one.

&ldquoYou can&rsquot make good health decisions if your environment is always working against you, because then you have to be on alert 24-7,&rdquo said Hassink, founder of the Nemours Weight Management Clinic in Wilmington, Delaware. &ldquoYou get tired. Things come up. It&rsquos hard to without creating a healthy environment in the first place.&rdquo

With the help of Hassink and other weight management experts, let&rsquos start fat-proofing your world.

STAY IN THE KNOW: Get caught up on what's going on around Houston. From sports to news and entertainment, check out the newsletters we're offering.


13 simple changes that lead to huge weight loss

Like lint on a black sweater, unhealthy foods and snacks can accumulate in your home without you realizing it.

Pie from the church bake sale, caramel popcorn from the Boy Scouts, a pork-kraut roll from Mom. And before you know it, you’re shoveling it into your mouth. Start the workweek fresh by taking a few minutes to rid your kitchen of crap and shake the airline stroopwafels out of your briefcase.

“It’s amazing how much food can creep in,” Hassink said. If you don’t have the heart to toss Mom’s signature dish, just divide it into smaller portions to freeze and reheat later. And don’t get doggie bags at restaurants anymore — unless they’re actually for your dog. Matt Rourke Show More Show Less

2 of 20 2. Trim down your social media “feed.”

Facebook could also be insidiously filling you out. If certain friends and family members are constantly sharing food videos and decadent recipes, their posts could be fattening up your space.

“How much time are you spending on those posts? Take notice if you find yourself getting hungry just looking at them,” Hassink said.

If you are, then hide, snooze or unfollow the worst offenders. Likewise, trade all those craft breweries and barbecue joints you follow for sites that deliver positive reinforcement, like healthy eating accounts.

4 of 20 3. Tweak your grocery list.

A common belief is that eating healthy costs a lot. Not true, says Dr. Adam Drewnowski, director of the University of Washington Center for Public Health Nutrition.

Research shows that the healthiest diets — ones rich in fruits, vegetables, fish and nuts — cost only $1.56 more per day (that’s $10.92 per week) than the least healthy diets — processed foods and meats, refined grains.

In fact, stocking your world with nutritious choices needn’t cost anything extra. Swap the 10 bucks you’re currently dropping on cold cuts, bread and chips for a pound of fresh strawberries ($3.99), an avocado ($1.50), a bag of romaine ($2.60) and two single-serving containers of Greek yogurt ($1 each).

Drewnowski calls this an “economic intervention,” a conscious spending of $1.56 a day on healthy foods instead of fattening, carb-filled ones that will pay off with gradual weight loss. Show More Show Less

4. Declare war on one junk food each month.

5. When traveling, book a room in a pedestrian-friendly part of town.

Whether you’re on the road for business or vacation, you’ll get more exercise and burn more calories if you skip the car rental and stay in a hotel or Airbnb in the center of town, where you can safely walk everywhere.

6. Call the hotel help desk.

7. Renting a car? Go compact.

8. Never let your fridge become empty.

9. Change your commute.

If you often succumb to temptation and stop for, say, a Grande Caffè Mocha at Starbucks on your way to work, consider changing your route. That drink, even when made with 2% milk, has 360 calories, 15 grams of fat, 44 grams of carbs and 35 grams of sugar.

Add a blueberry muffin and you’ve just turned breakfast into a gut bomb. Keeping your kryptonite out of sight will make it less convenient to pull in and indulge there.

Yi-Chin Lee, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

10. Make sure you’re safe at this dangerous time.

Specifically, the hour or two after work ends and before dinner begins is a weak spot for many, said Simon. Make sure you’re nowhere near a happy hour with free appetizers or an ice cream stand with a drive-thru during these times. Stash your favorite protein bar in your car or purse in case of emergency.

11. Parental-control yourself.

12. Find a “safety” restaurant.

13. Manage the candy stash.

To keep from filching Easter baskets or Halloween treats, buy candy just one day before the holiday. Buy only as much as needed, and then immediately get rid of leftovers. The less time sweets linger in the house, the less likely you’ll be to eat them.

And above all, never volunteer to be the parent who loans their garage to the Girl Scout troop for cookie storage. No one needs a literal garage of temptation.

Dr. Sandra Hassink has been studying childhood obesity for more than 30 years. And the most important thing she&rsquos learned &mdash applicable to kids and grown-ups alike &mdash is this: &ldquoAll the willpower in the world,&rdquo she says, &ldquocan&rsquot overcome an obesogenic environment."

In other words, to lose weight and keep it off, you have to adjust your world so it&rsquos not constantly tempting you. Instead of putting yourself on a diet, put your environment on one.

&ldquoYou can&rsquot make good health decisions if your environment is always working against you, because then you have to be on alert 24-7,&rdquo said Hassink, founder of the Nemours Weight Management Clinic in Wilmington, Delaware. &ldquoYou get tired. Things come up. It&rsquos hard to without creating a healthy environment in the first place.&rdquo

With the help of Hassink and other weight management experts, let&rsquos start fat-proofing your world.

STAY IN THE KNOW: Get caught up on what's going on around Houston. From sports to news and entertainment, check out the newsletters we're offering.


13 simple changes that lead to huge weight loss

Like lint on a black sweater, unhealthy foods and snacks can accumulate in your home without you realizing it.

Pie from the church bake sale, caramel popcorn from the Boy Scouts, a pork-kraut roll from Mom. And before you know it, you’re shoveling it into your mouth. Start the workweek fresh by taking a few minutes to rid your kitchen of crap and shake the airline stroopwafels out of your briefcase.

“It’s amazing how much food can creep in,” Hassink said. If you don’t have the heart to toss Mom’s signature dish, just divide it into smaller portions to freeze and reheat later. And don’t get doggie bags at restaurants anymore — unless they’re actually for your dog. Matt Rourke Show More Show Less

2 of 20 2. Trim down your social media “feed.”

Facebook could also be insidiously filling you out. If certain friends and family members are constantly sharing food videos and decadent recipes, their posts could be fattening up your space.

“How much time are you spending on those posts? Take notice if you find yourself getting hungry just looking at them,” Hassink said.

If you are, then hide, snooze or unfollow the worst offenders. Likewise, trade all those craft breweries and barbecue joints you follow for sites that deliver positive reinforcement, like healthy eating accounts.

4 of 20 3. Tweak your grocery list.

A common belief is that eating healthy costs a lot. Not true, says Dr. Adam Drewnowski, director of the University of Washington Center for Public Health Nutrition.

Research shows that the healthiest diets — ones rich in fruits, vegetables, fish and nuts — cost only $1.56 more per day (that’s $10.92 per week) than the least healthy diets — processed foods and meats, refined grains.

In fact, stocking your world with nutritious choices needn’t cost anything extra. Swap the 10 bucks you’re currently dropping on cold cuts, bread and chips for a pound of fresh strawberries ($3.99), an avocado ($1.50), a bag of romaine ($2.60) and two single-serving containers of Greek yogurt ($1 each).

Drewnowski calls this an “economic intervention,” a conscious spending of $1.56 a day on healthy foods instead of fattening, carb-filled ones that will pay off with gradual weight loss. Show More Show Less

4. Declare war on one junk food each month.

5. When traveling, book a room in a pedestrian-friendly part of town.

Whether you’re on the road for business or vacation, you’ll get more exercise and burn more calories if you skip the car rental and stay in a hotel or Airbnb in the center of town, where you can safely walk everywhere.

6. Call the hotel help desk.

7. Renting a car? Go compact.

8. Never let your fridge become empty.

9. Change your commute.

If you often succumb to temptation and stop for, say, a Grande Caffè Mocha at Starbucks on your way to work, consider changing your route. That drink, even when made with 2% milk, has 360 calories, 15 grams of fat, 44 grams of carbs and 35 grams of sugar.

Add a blueberry muffin and you’ve just turned breakfast into a gut bomb. Keeping your kryptonite out of sight will make it less convenient to pull in and indulge there.

Yi-Chin Lee, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

10. Make sure you’re safe at this dangerous time.

Specifically, the hour or two after work ends and before dinner begins is a weak spot for many, said Simon. Make sure you’re nowhere near a happy hour with free appetizers or an ice cream stand with a drive-thru during these times. Stash your favorite protein bar in your car or purse in case of emergency.

11. Parental-control yourself.

12. Find a “safety” restaurant.

13. Manage the candy stash.

To keep from filching Easter baskets or Halloween treats, buy candy just one day before the holiday. Buy only as much as needed, and then immediately get rid of leftovers. The less time sweets linger in the house, the less likely you’ll be to eat them.

And above all, never volunteer to be the parent who loans their garage to the Girl Scout troop for cookie storage. No one needs a literal garage of temptation.

Dr. Sandra Hassink has been studying childhood obesity for more than 30 years. And the most important thing she&rsquos learned &mdash applicable to kids and grown-ups alike &mdash is this: &ldquoAll the willpower in the world,&rdquo she says, &ldquocan&rsquot overcome an obesogenic environment."

In other words, to lose weight and keep it off, you have to adjust your world so it&rsquos not constantly tempting you. Instead of putting yourself on a diet, put your environment on one.

&ldquoYou can&rsquot make good health decisions if your environment is always working against you, because then you have to be on alert 24-7,&rdquo said Hassink, founder of the Nemours Weight Management Clinic in Wilmington, Delaware. &ldquoYou get tired. Things come up. It&rsquos hard to without creating a healthy environment in the first place.&rdquo

With the help of Hassink and other weight management experts, let&rsquos start fat-proofing your world.

STAY IN THE KNOW: Get caught up on what's going on around Houston. From sports to news and entertainment, check out the newsletters we're offering.


13 simple changes that lead to huge weight loss

Like lint on a black sweater, unhealthy foods and snacks can accumulate in your home without you realizing it.

Pie from the church bake sale, caramel popcorn from the Boy Scouts, a pork-kraut roll from Mom. And before you know it, you’re shoveling it into your mouth. Start the workweek fresh by taking a few minutes to rid your kitchen of crap and shake the airline stroopwafels out of your briefcase.

“It’s amazing how much food can creep in,” Hassink said. If you don’t have the heart to toss Mom’s signature dish, just divide it into smaller portions to freeze and reheat later. And don’t get doggie bags at restaurants anymore — unless they’re actually for your dog. Matt Rourke Show More Show Less

2 of 20 2. Trim down your social media “feed.”

Facebook could also be insidiously filling you out. If certain friends and family members are constantly sharing food videos and decadent recipes, their posts could be fattening up your space.

“How much time are you spending on those posts? Take notice if you find yourself getting hungry just looking at them,” Hassink said.

If you are, then hide, snooze or unfollow the worst offenders. Likewise, trade all those craft breweries and barbecue joints you follow for sites that deliver positive reinforcement, like healthy eating accounts.

4 of 20 3. Tweak your grocery list.

A common belief is that eating healthy costs a lot. Not true, says Dr. Adam Drewnowski, director of the University of Washington Center for Public Health Nutrition.

Research shows that the healthiest diets — ones rich in fruits, vegetables, fish and nuts — cost only $1.56 more per day (that’s $10.92 per week) than the least healthy diets — processed foods and meats, refined grains.

In fact, stocking your world with nutritious choices needn’t cost anything extra. Swap the 10 bucks you’re currently dropping on cold cuts, bread and chips for a pound of fresh strawberries ($3.99), an avocado ($1.50), a bag of romaine ($2.60) and two single-serving containers of Greek yogurt ($1 each).

Drewnowski calls this an “economic intervention,” a conscious spending of $1.56 a day on healthy foods instead of fattening, carb-filled ones that will pay off with gradual weight loss. Show More Show Less

4. Declare war on one junk food each month.

5. When traveling, book a room in a pedestrian-friendly part of town.

Whether you’re on the road for business or vacation, you’ll get more exercise and burn more calories if you skip the car rental and stay in a hotel or Airbnb in the center of town, where you can safely walk everywhere.

6. Call the hotel help desk.

7. Renting a car? Go compact.

8. Never let your fridge become empty.

9. Change your commute.

If you often succumb to temptation and stop for, say, a Grande Caffè Mocha at Starbucks on your way to work, consider changing your route. That drink, even when made with 2% milk, has 360 calories, 15 grams of fat, 44 grams of carbs and 35 grams of sugar.

Add a blueberry muffin and you’ve just turned breakfast into a gut bomb. Keeping your kryptonite out of sight will make it less convenient to pull in and indulge there.

Yi-Chin Lee, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

10. Make sure you’re safe at this dangerous time.

Specifically, the hour or two after work ends and before dinner begins is a weak spot for many, said Simon. Make sure you’re nowhere near a happy hour with free appetizers or an ice cream stand with a drive-thru during these times. Stash your favorite protein bar in your car or purse in case of emergency.

11. Parental-control yourself.

12. Find a “safety” restaurant.

13. Manage the candy stash.

To keep from filching Easter baskets or Halloween treats, buy candy just one day before the holiday. Buy only as much as needed, and then immediately get rid of leftovers. The less time sweets linger in the house, the less likely you’ll be to eat them.

And above all, never volunteer to be the parent who loans their garage to the Girl Scout troop for cookie storage. No one needs a literal garage of temptation.

Dr. Sandra Hassink has been studying childhood obesity for more than 30 years. And the most important thing she&rsquos learned &mdash applicable to kids and grown-ups alike &mdash is this: &ldquoAll the willpower in the world,&rdquo she says, &ldquocan&rsquot overcome an obesogenic environment."

In other words, to lose weight and keep it off, you have to adjust your world so it&rsquos not constantly tempting you. Instead of putting yourself on a diet, put your environment on one.

&ldquoYou can&rsquot make good health decisions if your environment is always working against you, because then you have to be on alert 24-7,&rdquo said Hassink, founder of the Nemours Weight Management Clinic in Wilmington, Delaware. &ldquoYou get tired. Things come up. It&rsquos hard to without creating a healthy environment in the first place.&rdquo

With the help of Hassink and other weight management experts, let&rsquos start fat-proofing your world.

STAY IN THE KNOW: Get caught up on what's going on around Houston. From sports to news and entertainment, check out the newsletters we're offering.


13 simple changes that lead to huge weight loss

Like lint on a black sweater, unhealthy foods and snacks can accumulate in your home without you realizing it.

Pie from the church bake sale, caramel popcorn from the Boy Scouts, a pork-kraut roll from Mom. And before you know it, you’re shoveling it into your mouth. Start the workweek fresh by taking a few minutes to rid your kitchen of crap and shake the airline stroopwafels out of your briefcase.

“It’s amazing how much food can creep in,” Hassink said. If you don’t have the heart to toss Mom’s signature dish, just divide it into smaller portions to freeze and reheat later. And don’t get doggie bags at restaurants anymore — unless they’re actually for your dog. Matt Rourke Show More Show Less

2 of 20 2. Trim down your social media “feed.”

Facebook could also be insidiously filling you out. If certain friends and family members are constantly sharing food videos and decadent recipes, their posts could be fattening up your space.

“How much time are you spending on those posts? Take notice if you find yourself getting hungry just looking at them,” Hassink said.

If you are, then hide, snooze or unfollow the worst offenders. Likewise, trade all those craft breweries and barbecue joints you follow for sites that deliver positive reinforcement, like healthy eating accounts.

4 of 20 3. Tweak your grocery list.

A common belief is that eating healthy costs a lot. Not true, says Dr. Adam Drewnowski, director of the University of Washington Center for Public Health Nutrition.

Research shows that the healthiest diets — ones rich in fruits, vegetables, fish and nuts — cost only $1.56 more per day (that’s $10.92 per week) than the least healthy diets — processed foods and meats, refined grains.

In fact, stocking your world with nutritious choices needn’t cost anything extra. Swap the 10 bucks you’re currently dropping on cold cuts, bread and chips for a pound of fresh strawberries ($3.99), an avocado ($1.50), a bag of romaine ($2.60) and two single-serving containers of Greek yogurt ($1 each).

Drewnowski calls this an “economic intervention,” a conscious spending of $1.56 a day on healthy foods instead of fattening, carb-filled ones that will pay off with gradual weight loss. Show More Show Less

4. Declare war on one junk food each month.

5. When traveling, book a room in a pedestrian-friendly part of town.

Whether you’re on the road for business or vacation, you’ll get more exercise and burn more calories if you skip the car rental and stay in a hotel or Airbnb in the center of town, where you can safely walk everywhere.

6. Call the hotel help desk.

7. Renting a car? Go compact.

8. Never let your fridge become empty.

9. Change your commute.

If you often succumb to temptation and stop for, say, a Grande Caffè Mocha at Starbucks on your way to work, consider changing your route. That drink, even when made with 2% milk, has 360 calories, 15 grams of fat, 44 grams of carbs and 35 grams of sugar.

Add a blueberry muffin and you’ve just turned breakfast into a gut bomb. Keeping your kryptonite out of sight will make it less convenient to pull in and indulge there.

Yi-Chin Lee, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

10. Make sure you’re safe at this dangerous time.

Specifically, the hour or two after work ends and before dinner begins is a weak spot for many, said Simon. Make sure you’re nowhere near a happy hour with free appetizers or an ice cream stand with a drive-thru during these times. Stash your favorite protein bar in your car or purse in case of emergency.

11. Parental-control yourself.

12. Find a “safety” restaurant.

13. Manage the candy stash.

To keep from filching Easter baskets or Halloween treats, buy candy just one day before the holiday. Buy only as much as needed, and then immediately get rid of leftovers. The less time sweets linger in the house, the less likely you’ll be to eat them.

And above all, never volunteer to be the parent who loans their garage to the Girl Scout troop for cookie storage. No one needs a literal garage of temptation.

Dr. Sandra Hassink has been studying childhood obesity for more than 30 years. And the most important thing she&rsquos learned &mdash applicable to kids and grown-ups alike &mdash is this: &ldquoAll the willpower in the world,&rdquo she says, &ldquocan&rsquot overcome an obesogenic environment."

In other words, to lose weight and keep it off, you have to adjust your world so it&rsquos not constantly tempting you. Instead of putting yourself on a diet, put your environment on one.

&ldquoYou can&rsquot make good health decisions if your environment is always working against you, because then you have to be on alert 24-7,&rdquo said Hassink, founder of the Nemours Weight Management Clinic in Wilmington, Delaware. &ldquoYou get tired. Things come up. It&rsquos hard to without creating a healthy environment in the first place.&rdquo

With the help of Hassink and other weight management experts, let&rsquos start fat-proofing your world.

STAY IN THE KNOW: Get caught up on what's going on around Houston. From sports to news and entertainment, check out the newsletters we're offering.


13 simple changes that lead to huge weight loss

Like lint on a black sweater, unhealthy foods and snacks can accumulate in your home without you realizing it.

Pie from the church bake sale, caramel popcorn from the Boy Scouts, a pork-kraut roll from Mom. And before you know it, you’re shoveling it into your mouth. Start the workweek fresh by taking a few minutes to rid your kitchen of crap and shake the airline stroopwafels out of your briefcase.

“It’s amazing how much food can creep in,” Hassink said. If you don’t have the heart to toss Mom’s signature dish, just divide it into smaller portions to freeze and reheat later. And don’t get doggie bags at restaurants anymore — unless they’re actually for your dog. Matt Rourke Show More Show Less

2 of 20 2. Trim down your social media “feed.”

Facebook could also be insidiously filling you out. If certain friends and family members are constantly sharing food videos and decadent recipes, their posts could be fattening up your space.

“How much time are you spending on those posts? Take notice if you find yourself getting hungry just looking at them,” Hassink said.

If you are, then hide, snooze or unfollow the worst offenders. Likewise, trade all those craft breweries and barbecue joints you follow for sites that deliver positive reinforcement, like healthy eating accounts.

4 of 20 3. Tweak your grocery list.

A common belief is that eating healthy costs a lot. Not true, says Dr. Adam Drewnowski, director of the University of Washington Center for Public Health Nutrition.

Research shows that the healthiest diets — ones rich in fruits, vegetables, fish and nuts — cost only $1.56 more per day (that’s $10.92 per week) than the least healthy diets — processed foods and meats, refined grains.

In fact, stocking your world with nutritious choices needn’t cost anything extra. Swap the 10 bucks you’re currently dropping on cold cuts, bread and chips for a pound of fresh strawberries ($3.99), an avocado ($1.50), a bag of romaine ($2.60) and two single-serving containers of Greek yogurt ($1 each).

Drewnowski calls this an “economic intervention,” a conscious spending of $1.56 a day on healthy foods instead of fattening, carb-filled ones that will pay off with gradual weight loss. Show More Show Less

4. Declare war on one junk food each month.

5. When traveling, book a room in a pedestrian-friendly part of town.

Whether you’re on the road for business or vacation, you’ll get more exercise and burn more calories if you skip the car rental and stay in a hotel or Airbnb in the center of town, where you can safely walk everywhere.

6. Call the hotel help desk.

7. Renting a car? Go compact.

8. Never let your fridge become empty.

9. Change your commute.

If you often succumb to temptation and stop for, say, a Grande Caffè Mocha at Starbucks on your way to work, consider changing your route. That drink, even when made with 2% milk, has 360 calories, 15 grams of fat, 44 grams of carbs and 35 grams of sugar.

Add a blueberry muffin and you’ve just turned breakfast into a gut bomb. Keeping your kryptonite out of sight will make it less convenient to pull in and indulge there.

Yi-Chin Lee, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

10. Make sure you’re safe at this dangerous time.

Specifically, the hour or two after work ends and before dinner begins is a weak spot for many, said Simon. Make sure you’re nowhere near a happy hour with free appetizers or an ice cream stand with a drive-thru during these times. Stash your favorite protein bar in your car or purse in case of emergency.

11. Parental-control yourself.

12. Find a “safety” restaurant.

13. Manage the candy stash.

To keep from filching Easter baskets or Halloween treats, buy candy just one day before the holiday. Buy only as much as needed, and then immediately get rid of leftovers. The less time sweets linger in the house, the less likely you’ll be to eat them.

And above all, never volunteer to be the parent who loans their garage to the Girl Scout troop for cookie storage. No one needs a literal garage of temptation.

Dr. Sandra Hassink has been studying childhood obesity for more than 30 years. And the most important thing she&rsquos learned &mdash applicable to kids and grown-ups alike &mdash is this: &ldquoAll the willpower in the world,&rdquo she says, &ldquocan&rsquot overcome an obesogenic environment."

In other words, to lose weight and keep it off, you have to adjust your world so it&rsquos not constantly tempting you. Instead of putting yourself on a diet, put your environment on one.

&ldquoYou can&rsquot make good health decisions if your environment is always working against you, because then you have to be on alert 24-7,&rdquo said Hassink, founder of the Nemours Weight Management Clinic in Wilmington, Delaware. &ldquoYou get tired. Things come up. It&rsquos hard to without creating a healthy environment in the first place.&rdquo

With the help of Hassink and other weight management experts, let&rsquos start fat-proofing your world.

STAY IN THE KNOW: Get caught up on what's going on around Houston. From sports to news and entertainment, check out the newsletters we're offering.


13 simple changes that lead to huge weight loss

Like lint on a black sweater, unhealthy foods and snacks can accumulate in your home without you realizing it.

Pie from the church bake sale, caramel popcorn from the Boy Scouts, a pork-kraut roll from Mom. And before you know it, you’re shoveling it into your mouth. Start the workweek fresh by taking a few minutes to rid your kitchen of crap and shake the airline stroopwafels out of your briefcase.

“It’s amazing how much food can creep in,” Hassink said. If you don’t have the heart to toss Mom’s signature dish, just divide it into smaller portions to freeze and reheat later. And don’t get doggie bags at restaurants anymore — unless they’re actually for your dog. Matt Rourke Show More Show Less

2 of 20 2. Trim down your social media “feed.”

Facebook could also be insidiously filling you out. If certain friends and family members are constantly sharing food videos and decadent recipes, their posts could be fattening up your space.

“How much time are you spending on those posts? Take notice if you find yourself getting hungry just looking at them,” Hassink said.

If you are, then hide, snooze or unfollow the worst offenders. Likewise, trade all those craft breweries and barbecue joints you follow for sites that deliver positive reinforcement, like healthy eating accounts.

4 of 20 3. Tweak your grocery list.

A common belief is that eating healthy costs a lot. Not true, says Dr. Adam Drewnowski, director of the University of Washington Center for Public Health Nutrition.

Research shows that the healthiest diets — ones rich in fruits, vegetables, fish and nuts — cost only $1.56 more per day (that’s $10.92 per week) than the least healthy diets — processed foods and meats, refined grains.

In fact, stocking your world with nutritious choices needn’t cost anything extra. Swap the 10 bucks you’re currently dropping on cold cuts, bread and chips for a pound of fresh strawberries ($3.99), an avocado ($1.50), a bag of romaine ($2.60) and two single-serving containers of Greek yogurt ($1 each).

Drewnowski calls this an “economic intervention,” a conscious spending of $1.56 a day on healthy foods instead of fattening, carb-filled ones that will pay off with gradual weight loss. Show More Show Less

4. Declare war on one junk food each month.

5. When traveling, book a room in a pedestrian-friendly part of town.

Whether you’re on the road for business or vacation, you’ll get more exercise and burn more calories if you skip the car rental and stay in a hotel or Airbnb in the center of town, where you can safely walk everywhere.

6. Call the hotel help desk.

7. Renting a car? Go compact.

8. Never let your fridge become empty.

9. Change your commute.

If you often succumb to temptation and stop for, say, a Grande Caffè Mocha at Starbucks on your way to work, consider changing your route. That drink, even when made with 2% milk, has 360 calories, 15 grams of fat, 44 grams of carbs and 35 grams of sugar.

Add a blueberry muffin and you’ve just turned breakfast into a gut bomb. Keeping your kryptonite out of sight will make it less convenient to pull in and indulge there.

Yi-Chin Lee, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer Show More Show Less

10. Make sure you’re safe at this dangerous time.

Specifically, the hour or two after work ends and before dinner begins is a weak spot for many, said Simon. Make sure you’re nowhere near a happy hour with free appetizers or an ice cream stand with a drive-thru during these times. Stash your favorite protein bar in your car or purse in case of emergency.

11. Parental-control yourself.

12. Find a “safety” restaurant.

13. Manage the candy stash.

To keep from filching Easter baskets or Halloween treats, buy candy just one day before the holiday. Buy only as much as needed, and then immediately get rid of leftovers. The less time sweets linger in the house, the less likely you’ll be to eat them.

And above all, never volunteer to be the parent who loans their garage to the Girl Scout troop for cookie storage. No one needs a literal garage of temptation.

Dr. Sandra Hassink has been studying childhood obesity for more than 30 years. And the most important thing she&rsquos learned &mdash applicable to kids and grown-ups alike &mdash is this: &ldquoAll the willpower in the world,&rdquo she says, &ldquocan&rsquot overcome an obesogenic environment."

In other words, to lose weight and keep it off, you have to adjust your world so it&rsquos not constantly tempting you. Instead of putting yourself on a diet, put your environment on one.

&ldquoYou can&rsquot make good health decisions if your environment is always working against you, because then you have to be on alert 24-7,&rdquo said Hassink, founder of the Nemours Weight Management Clinic in Wilmington, Delaware. &ldquoYou get tired. Things come up. It&rsquos hard to without creating a healthy environment in the first place.&rdquo

With the help of Hassink and other weight management experts, let&rsquos start fat-proofing your world.

STAY IN THE KNOW: Get caught up on what's going on around Houston. From sports to news and entertainment, check out the newsletters we're offering.