Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Vanilla-Brown Butter Madeleines

Vanilla-Brown Butter Madeleines

To prepare the madeleine pan, use a pastry brush (easiest) or a paper towel to coat the molds with softened butter, then dust with flour and tap out the excess. (If you’d like, you can coat the molds with baker’s spray.) Do this even if your molds are nonstick or silicone; it’s good to be on the safe side. If your pan is silicone, place it on a baking sheet.

Whisk the flour and baking powder together.

Put the butter in a small saucepan and bring it to a boil over medium heat, swirling the pan occasionally. Allow the butter to bubble away until it turns a deep honey brown, 5 to 10 minutes. Don’t turn your back on the pan — the difference between brown and black is measured in seconds. And don’t worry about the little brown flecks in the bottom of the pan — they’re a good thing. Pour the butter into a heatproof glass or bowl and measure out 6 tablespoons, which is what you’ll need for the mads (and probably exactly what you’ll have).

Put the sugar in a medium bowl. If you’re using a vanilla bean (if using extract, you’ll add it later), slice it in half lengthwise and use the back of your knife to scrape out the soft, seedy pulp; put the pulp on top of the sugar. (You can use the pod to make vanilla sugar.) Using your fingertips, rub the ingredients together until the sugar is moist and fragrant. Add the eggs and whisk energetically for a minute. If you’re using extract, whisk it in now. Whisk in the salt and honey. Still using the whisk (or switch to a spatula, if it’s more comfortable for you) and a soft touch, blend in the dry ingredients. When they are completely incorporated, gently stir and fold in the melted butter a little at a time, checking the bottom of the bowl to make sure that none pools there. Stir in the alcohol or milk.

Divide the batter among the molds. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour, preferably 2 or 3 hours.

Getting ready to bake: Center a rack in the oven and place a baking sheet on the rack. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Carefully place the madeleine mold on the hot baking sheet. Or, if using a silicone mold, leave it on the baking sheet it was on. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, or until the madeleines are puffed and browned around the edges. Remove the pan from the oven and, if it’s metal, grab an end and tap the pan on the counter — the madeleines should come tumbling out. If you’re using a silicone mold, turn it upside down over the counter and pull at two opposite ends until the cookies fall out. Pry out any reluctant mads with a table knife.

Dust the cookies with confectioners’ sugar and serve them as soon as you can.

Playing around: Classic Madeleines. Don’t brown the butter. Instead, melt 3/4 stick unsalted butter and set it aside to cool. Omit the vanilla bean and rub the freshly grated zest of 1 lemon into the sugar; whisk 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract into the batter after the eggs are incorporated. Finally, use milk instead of the alcohol (or not — the classics are wonderful with a hit of dark rum).

Double-Butter Mads. One morning I was drawn into the kitchen by the scent of browning butter (an unmistakable aroma) and found my husband at the stove. He’d melted butter in a skillet, let it brown and, having split day-old madeleines in half lengthwise, was toasting them in the hot butter. Eaten right out of the skillet with a dab of jam, they were sensational. In fact, they were so good that it would be worth letting some of your mads go stale just to have them like this the next morning.

Storing: The madeleine batter can be kept, covered with a piece of plastic wrap pressed against the surface, in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. The baked cookies can be kept covered at room temperature for up to 1 day; their texture will not stay the same, but their taste will. The madeleines can also be wrapped airtight and frozen for up to 2 months. Thaw, then warm briefly in a 350-degree-F oven before serving.


How to Make Madeleines

Melt 10 tablespoons butter over medium heat. (Leave the remaining 2 tablespoons on the counter to come to room temperature. Set aside for the pan.) Cook butter over medium-low, stirring frequently, while it foams and bubbles. After about 5 minutes, the butter will darken and you&rsquoll see particles on the bottom of the pan. Once these become golden or light brown, remove the pan from the heat and pour butter into a heat-proof container. Let cool.

Whisk sifted flour, salt, and baking powder together. Set aside.

Beat eggs and sugar together with an electric mixer on medium-high speed for about 6&ndash8 minutes, or until thickened and pale yellow. Beat in the extracts.

Gently fold in half of the flour mixture. Fold in the butter. Add the remaining flour and fold gently until incorporated. Place bowl in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 375ºF. Use a pastry brush to coat the Madeleine tin cavities completely. Flour the pans, tapping out the excess.

Do not stir the batter after removing from the refrigerator. Place a heaping tablespoon of batter into each prepared cavity. Do not spread. Place in the oven and lower the temperature to 350ºF. Bake for 12 minutes or until the cookies bounce back when lightly pressed.

Remove from oven and place a wire rack upside-down on top of the pan. With oven mitts, grab the pan and cooling rack and flip, giving the pan a few good shakes. Remove the pan, and the cookies should release.

If baking in batches, return the dough to the refrigerator between batches. Wash the pan with cool water and re-butter and flour the pan.

Store cooled madeleines in an airtight container, layering with waxed paper, for several days.

Are they cookies? Are they tiny cakes? (I&rsquom having flashbacks of Fig Newton commercials now.) I think of madeleines as cake-like cookies: pillow-y with a beautiful crumb, delicate but sturdy enough for a glaze or a dip in melted chocolate.

I love everything about them from the taste, to the shape, to the texture, to the spelling of the name. Does Madeleine remind anyone of a little French girl who lived in a house in Paris covered in vines?

Madeleines are a bit fussy to make, but not difficult at all. The fussiness comes from needing a special pan and browning the butter for the batter. That pan gives madeleines their signature scalloped shape, and the brown butter adds more flavor than just melted butter.

Speaking of brown butter, I tend to call mine &ldquogolden butter.&rdquo I don&rsquot like it to get too, too dark, but it still has that nutty, rich flavor.

As for the flavor of the madeleines, the sky&rsquos the limit. More traditional madeleines are vanilla or citrus flavored. My favorite is a vanilla-almond one.

You&rsquoll find them frequently dusted with powdered sugar, but don&rsquot be afraid to add a thin glaze. Just don&rsquot cover up those gorgeous scallops!

While the butter is cooling, you&rsquoll whisk the dry ingredients together.

The eggs get beaten with the sugar for several minutes until they&rsquore light in color and thickened.

The butter and flour mixture get gently folded in, and then the batter rests in the refrigerator for a bit. Because of the gentle folding so as not to lose the airiness, the rest in the fridge is a good chance for the flour to absorb the liquid. Madeleines are known for having a &ldquobump,&rdquo and the refrigeration helps to achieve that as well.

A bit about the bump: if your madeleines don&rsquot have them, don&rsquot worry! They taste EXACTLY the same. The texture is exactly the same.

Plus, the bump is on what is the back of the cookie. What&rsquos really important is that scallop on the front.

Before bringing the batter out of the fridge, prepare your pan. Just like with a Bundt pan, greasing every little millimeter of it is important. I also flour the pan after I&rsquove buttered it.

See how the batter has thickened and poofed a little in the fridge? Don&rsquot stir it. Just start scooping.

Dollop a heaping tablespoon of chilled batter into each prepared cavity. No need to spread the batter it&rsquoll spread perfectly in the oven.

Once cooled, dust with powdered sugar.

Dipping them in chocolate is always a good option in my book!

Melt chocolate and dip half of each cookie. Place on a waxed paper-lined cookie sheet to set in the refrigerator.

Madeleines may be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a few days.

The recipe for vanilla-almond madeleines follows, but here are a few variations:

Lemon: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon lemon juice and the zest of one lemon with the vanilla.

Orange Liqueur-Glazed: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon orange juice and the zest of one orange with the vanilla. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 2 tablespoons milk and 2 tablespoons Cointreau. Pour glaze over cooled cookies.

Vanilla Bean: Replace vanilla extract with vanilla bean paste. Omit almond extract. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 3 tablespoons milk and 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste. Pour glaze over the cooled cookies.

Where do you stand on the great madeleine debate? Do you consider them cookies or cake?


How to Make Madeleines

Melt 10 tablespoons butter over medium heat. (Leave the remaining 2 tablespoons on the counter to come to room temperature. Set aside for the pan.) Cook butter over medium-low, stirring frequently, while it foams and bubbles. After about 5 minutes, the butter will darken and you&rsquoll see particles on the bottom of the pan. Once these become golden or light brown, remove the pan from the heat and pour butter into a heat-proof container. Let cool.

Whisk sifted flour, salt, and baking powder together. Set aside.

Beat eggs and sugar together with an electric mixer on medium-high speed for about 6&ndash8 minutes, or until thickened and pale yellow. Beat in the extracts.

Gently fold in half of the flour mixture. Fold in the butter. Add the remaining flour and fold gently until incorporated. Place bowl in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 375ºF. Use a pastry brush to coat the Madeleine tin cavities completely. Flour the pans, tapping out the excess.

Do not stir the batter after removing from the refrigerator. Place a heaping tablespoon of batter into each prepared cavity. Do not spread. Place in the oven and lower the temperature to 350ºF. Bake for 12 minutes or until the cookies bounce back when lightly pressed.

Remove from oven and place a wire rack upside-down on top of the pan. With oven mitts, grab the pan and cooling rack and flip, giving the pan a few good shakes. Remove the pan, and the cookies should release.

If baking in batches, return the dough to the refrigerator between batches. Wash the pan with cool water and re-butter and flour the pan.

Store cooled madeleines in an airtight container, layering with waxed paper, for several days.

Are they cookies? Are they tiny cakes? (I&rsquom having flashbacks of Fig Newton commercials now.) I think of madeleines as cake-like cookies: pillow-y with a beautiful crumb, delicate but sturdy enough for a glaze or a dip in melted chocolate.

I love everything about them from the taste, to the shape, to the texture, to the spelling of the name. Does Madeleine remind anyone of a little French girl who lived in a house in Paris covered in vines?

Madeleines are a bit fussy to make, but not difficult at all. The fussiness comes from needing a special pan and browning the butter for the batter. That pan gives madeleines their signature scalloped shape, and the brown butter adds more flavor than just melted butter.

Speaking of brown butter, I tend to call mine &ldquogolden butter.&rdquo I don&rsquot like it to get too, too dark, but it still has that nutty, rich flavor.

As for the flavor of the madeleines, the sky&rsquos the limit. More traditional madeleines are vanilla or citrus flavored. My favorite is a vanilla-almond one.

You&rsquoll find them frequently dusted with powdered sugar, but don&rsquot be afraid to add a thin glaze. Just don&rsquot cover up those gorgeous scallops!

While the butter is cooling, you&rsquoll whisk the dry ingredients together.

The eggs get beaten with the sugar for several minutes until they&rsquore light in color and thickened.

The butter and flour mixture get gently folded in, and then the batter rests in the refrigerator for a bit. Because of the gentle folding so as not to lose the airiness, the rest in the fridge is a good chance for the flour to absorb the liquid. Madeleines are known for having a &ldquobump,&rdquo and the refrigeration helps to achieve that as well.

A bit about the bump: if your madeleines don&rsquot have them, don&rsquot worry! They taste EXACTLY the same. The texture is exactly the same.

Plus, the bump is on what is the back of the cookie. What&rsquos really important is that scallop on the front.

Before bringing the batter out of the fridge, prepare your pan. Just like with a Bundt pan, greasing every little millimeter of it is important. I also flour the pan after I&rsquove buttered it.

See how the batter has thickened and poofed a little in the fridge? Don&rsquot stir it. Just start scooping.

Dollop a heaping tablespoon of chilled batter into each prepared cavity. No need to spread the batter it&rsquoll spread perfectly in the oven.

Once cooled, dust with powdered sugar.

Dipping them in chocolate is always a good option in my book!

Melt chocolate and dip half of each cookie. Place on a waxed paper-lined cookie sheet to set in the refrigerator.

Madeleines may be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a few days.

The recipe for vanilla-almond madeleines follows, but here are a few variations:

Lemon: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon lemon juice and the zest of one lemon with the vanilla.

Orange Liqueur-Glazed: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon orange juice and the zest of one orange with the vanilla. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 2 tablespoons milk and 2 tablespoons Cointreau. Pour glaze over cooled cookies.

Vanilla Bean: Replace vanilla extract with vanilla bean paste. Omit almond extract. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 3 tablespoons milk and 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste. Pour glaze over the cooled cookies.

Where do you stand on the great madeleine debate? Do you consider them cookies or cake?


How to Make Madeleines

Melt 10 tablespoons butter over medium heat. (Leave the remaining 2 tablespoons on the counter to come to room temperature. Set aside for the pan.) Cook butter over medium-low, stirring frequently, while it foams and bubbles. After about 5 minutes, the butter will darken and you&rsquoll see particles on the bottom of the pan. Once these become golden or light brown, remove the pan from the heat and pour butter into a heat-proof container. Let cool.

Whisk sifted flour, salt, and baking powder together. Set aside.

Beat eggs and sugar together with an electric mixer on medium-high speed for about 6&ndash8 minutes, or until thickened and pale yellow. Beat in the extracts.

Gently fold in half of the flour mixture. Fold in the butter. Add the remaining flour and fold gently until incorporated. Place bowl in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 375ºF. Use a pastry brush to coat the Madeleine tin cavities completely. Flour the pans, tapping out the excess.

Do not stir the batter after removing from the refrigerator. Place a heaping tablespoon of batter into each prepared cavity. Do not spread. Place in the oven and lower the temperature to 350ºF. Bake for 12 minutes or until the cookies bounce back when lightly pressed.

Remove from oven and place a wire rack upside-down on top of the pan. With oven mitts, grab the pan and cooling rack and flip, giving the pan a few good shakes. Remove the pan, and the cookies should release.

If baking in batches, return the dough to the refrigerator between batches. Wash the pan with cool water and re-butter and flour the pan.

Store cooled madeleines in an airtight container, layering with waxed paper, for several days.

Are they cookies? Are they tiny cakes? (I&rsquom having flashbacks of Fig Newton commercials now.) I think of madeleines as cake-like cookies: pillow-y with a beautiful crumb, delicate but sturdy enough for a glaze or a dip in melted chocolate.

I love everything about them from the taste, to the shape, to the texture, to the spelling of the name. Does Madeleine remind anyone of a little French girl who lived in a house in Paris covered in vines?

Madeleines are a bit fussy to make, but not difficult at all. The fussiness comes from needing a special pan and browning the butter for the batter. That pan gives madeleines their signature scalloped shape, and the brown butter adds more flavor than just melted butter.

Speaking of brown butter, I tend to call mine &ldquogolden butter.&rdquo I don&rsquot like it to get too, too dark, but it still has that nutty, rich flavor.

As for the flavor of the madeleines, the sky&rsquos the limit. More traditional madeleines are vanilla or citrus flavored. My favorite is a vanilla-almond one.

You&rsquoll find them frequently dusted with powdered sugar, but don&rsquot be afraid to add a thin glaze. Just don&rsquot cover up those gorgeous scallops!

While the butter is cooling, you&rsquoll whisk the dry ingredients together.

The eggs get beaten with the sugar for several minutes until they&rsquore light in color and thickened.

The butter and flour mixture get gently folded in, and then the batter rests in the refrigerator for a bit. Because of the gentle folding so as not to lose the airiness, the rest in the fridge is a good chance for the flour to absorb the liquid. Madeleines are known for having a &ldquobump,&rdquo and the refrigeration helps to achieve that as well.

A bit about the bump: if your madeleines don&rsquot have them, don&rsquot worry! They taste EXACTLY the same. The texture is exactly the same.

Plus, the bump is on what is the back of the cookie. What&rsquos really important is that scallop on the front.

Before bringing the batter out of the fridge, prepare your pan. Just like with a Bundt pan, greasing every little millimeter of it is important. I also flour the pan after I&rsquove buttered it.

See how the batter has thickened and poofed a little in the fridge? Don&rsquot stir it. Just start scooping.

Dollop a heaping tablespoon of chilled batter into each prepared cavity. No need to spread the batter it&rsquoll spread perfectly in the oven.

Once cooled, dust with powdered sugar.

Dipping them in chocolate is always a good option in my book!

Melt chocolate and dip half of each cookie. Place on a waxed paper-lined cookie sheet to set in the refrigerator.

Madeleines may be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a few days.

The recipe for vanilla-almond madeleines follows, but here are a few variations:

Lemon: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon lemon juice and the zest of one lemon with the vanilla.

Orange Liqueur-Glazed: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon orange juice and the zest of one orange with the vanilla. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 2 tablespoons milk and 2 tablespoons Cointreau. Pour glaze over cooled cookies.

Vanilla Bean: Replace vanilla extract with vanilla bean paste. Omit almond extract. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 3 tablespoons milk and 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste. Pour glaze over the cooled cookies.

Where do you stand on the great madeleine debate? Do you consider them cookies or cake?


How to Make Madeleines

Melt 10 tablespoons butter over medium heat. (Leave the remaining 2 tablespoons on the counter to come to room temperature. Set aside for the pan.) Cook butter over medium-low, stirring frequently, while it foams and bubbles. After about 5 minutes, the butter will darken and you&rsquoll see particles on the bottom of the pan. Once these become golden or light brown, remove the pan from the heat and pour butter into a heat-proof container. Let cool.

Whisk sifted flour, salt, and baking powder together. Set aside.

Beat eggs and sugar together with an electric mixer on medium-high speed for about 6&ndash8 minutes, or until thickened and pale yellow. Beat in the extracts.

Gently fold in half of the flour mixture. Fold in the butter. Add the remaining flour and fold gently until incorporated. Place bowl in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 375ºF. Use a pastry brush to coat the Madeleine tin cavities completely. Flour the pans, tapping out the excess.

Do not stir the batter after removing from the refrigerator. Place a heaping tablespoon of batter into each prepared cavity. Do not spread. Place in the oven and lower the temperature to 350ºF. Bake for 12 minutes or until the cookies bounce back when lightly pressed.

Remove from oven and place a wire rack upside-down on top of the pan. With oven mitts, grab the pan and cooling rack and flip, giving the pan a few good shakes. Remove the pan, and the cookies should release.

If baking in batches, return the dough to the refrigerator between batches. Wash the pan with cool water and re-butter and flour the pan.

Store cooled madeleines in an airtight container, layering with waxed paper, for several days.

Are they cookies? Are they tiny cakes? (I&rsquom having flashbacks of Fig Newton commercials now.) I think of madeleines as cake-like cookies: pillow-y with a beautiful crumb, delicate but sturdy enough for a glaze or a dip in melted chocolate.

I love everything about them from the taste, to the shape, to the texture, to the spelling of the name. Does Madeleine remind anyone of a little French girl who lived in a house in Paris covered in vines?

Madeleines are a bit fussy to make, but not difficult at all. The fussiness comes from needing a special pan and browning the butter for the batter. That pan gives madeleines their signature scalloped shape, and the brown butter adds more flavor than just melted butter.

Speaking of brown butter, I tend to call mine &ldquogolden butter.&rdquo I don&rsquot like it to get too, too dark, but it still has that nutty, rich flavor.

As for the flavor of the madeleines, the sky&rsquos the limit. More traditional madeleines are vanilla or citrus flavored. My favorite is a vanilla-almond one.

You&rsquoll find them frequently dusted with powdered sugar, but don&rsquot be afraid to add a thin glaze. Just don&rsquot cover up those gorgeous scallops!

While the butter is cooling, you&rsquoll whisk the dry ingredients together.

The eggs get beaten with the sugar for several minutes until they&rsquore light in color and thickened.

The butter and flour mixture get gently folded in, and then the batter rests in the refrigerator for a bit. Because of the gentle folding so as not to lose the airiness, the rest in the fridge is a good chance for the flour to absorb the liquid. Madeleines are known for having a &ldquobump,&rdquo and the refrigeration helps to achieve that as well.

A bit about the bump: if your madeleines don&rsquot have them, don&rsquot worry! They taste EXACTLY the same. The texture is exactly the same.

Plus, the bump is on what is the back of the cookie. What&rsquos really important is that scallop on the front.

Before bringing the batter out of the fridge, prepare your pan. Just like with a Bundt pan, greasing every little millimeter of it is important. I also flour the pan after I&rsquove buttered it.

See how the batter has thickened and poofed a little in the fridge? Don&rsquot stir it. Just start scooping.

Dollop a heaping tablespoon of chilled batter into each prepared cavity. No need to spread the batter it&rsquoll spread perfectly in the oven.

Once cooled, dust with powdered sugar.

Dipping them in chocolate is always a good option in my book!

Melt chocolate and dip half of each cookie. Place on a waxed paper-lined cookie sheet to set in the refrigerator.

Madeleines may be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a few days.

The recipe for vanilla-almond madeleines follows, but here are a few variations:

Lemon: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon lemon juice and the zest of one lemon with the vanilla.

Orange Liqueur-Glazed: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon orange juice and the zest of one orange with the vanilla. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 2 tablespoons milk and 2 tablespoons Cointreau. Pour glaze over cooled cookies.

Vanilla Bean: Replace vanilla extract with vanilla bean paste. Omit almond extract. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 3 tablespoons milk and 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste. Pour glaze over the cooled cookies.

Where do you stand on the great madeleine debate? Do you consider them cookies or cake?


How to Make Madeleines

Melt 10 tablespoons butter over medium heat. (Leave the remaining 2 tablespoons on the counter to come to room temperature. Set aside for the pan.) Cook butter over medium-low, stirring frequently, while it foams and bubbles. After about 5 minutes, the butter will darken and you&rsquoll see particles on the bottom of the pan. Once these become golden or light brown, remove the pan from the heat and pour butter into a heat-proof container. Let cool.

Whisk sifted flour, salt, and baking powder together. Set aside.

Beat eggs and sugar together with an electric mixer on medium-high speed for about 6&ndash8 minutes, or until thickened and pale yellow. Beat in the extracts.

Gently fold in half of the flour mixture. Fold in the butter. Add the remaining flour and fold gently until incorporated. Place bowl in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 375ºF. Use a pastry brush to coat the Madeleine tin cavities completely. Flour the pans, tapping out the excess.

Do not stir the batter after removing from the refrigerator. Place a heaping tablespoon of batter into each prepared cavity. Do not spread. Place in the oven and lower the temperature to 350ºF. Bake for 12 minutes or until the cookies bounce back when lightly pressed.

Remove from oven and place a wire rack upside-down on top of the pan. With oven mitts, grab the pan and cooling rack and flip, giving the pan a few good shakes. Remove the pan, and the cookies should release.

If baking in batches, return the dough to the refrigerator between batches. Wash the pan with cool water and re-butter and flour the pan.

Store cooled madeleines in an airtight container, layering with waxed paper, for several days.

Are they cookies? Are they tiny cakes? (I&rsquom having flashbacks of Fig Newton commercials now.) I think of madeleines as cake-like cookies: pillow-y with a beautiful crumb, delicate but sturdy enough for a glaze or a dip in melted chocolate.

I love everything about them from the taste, to the shape, to the texture, to the spelling of the name. Does Madeleine remind anyone of a little French girl who lived in a house in Paris covered in vines?

Madeleines are a bit fussy to make, but not difficult at all. The fussiness comes from needing a special pan and browning the butter for the batter. That pan gives madeleines their signature scalloped shape, and the brown butter adds more flavor than just melted butter.

Speaking of brown butter, I tend to call mine &ldquogolden butter.&rdquo I don&rsquot like it to get too, too dark, but it still has that nutty, rich flavor.

As for the flavor of the madeleines, the sky&rsquos the limit. More traditional madeleines are vanilla or citrus flavored. My favorite is a vanilla-almond one.

You&rsquoll find them frequently dusted with powdered sugar, but don&rsquot be afraid to add a thin glaze. Just don&rsquot cover up those gorgeous scallops!

While the butter is cooling, you&rsquoll whisk the dry ingredients together.

The eggs get beaten with the sugar for several minutes until they&rsquore light in color and thickened.

The butter and flour mixture get gently folded in, and then the batter rests in the refrigerator for a bit. Because of the gentle folding so as not to lose the airiness, the rest in the fridge is a good chance for the flour to absorb the liquid. Madeleines are known for having a &ldquobump,&rdquo and the refrigeration helps to achieve that as well.

A bit about the bump: if your madeleines don&rsquot have them, don&rsquot worry! They taste EXACTLY the same. The texture is exactly the same.

Plus, the bump is on what is the back of the cookie. What&rsquos really important is that scallop on the front.

Before bringing the batter out of the fridge, prepare your pan. Just like with a Bundt pan, greasing every little millimeter of it is important. I also flour the pan after I&rsquove buttered it.

See how the batter has thickened and poofed a little in the fridge? Don&rsquot stir it. Just start scooping.

Dollop a heaping tablespoon of chilled batter into each prepared cavity. No need to spread the batter it&rsquoll spread perfectly in the oven.

Once cooled, dust with powdered sugar.

Dipping them in chocolate is always a good option in my book!

Melt chocolate and dip half of each cookie. Place on a waxed paper-lined cookie sheet to set in the refrigerator.

Madeleines may be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a few days.

The recipe for vanilla-almond madeleines follows, but here are a few variations:

Lemon: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon lemon juice and the zest of one lemon with the vanilla.

Orange Liqueur-Glazed: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon orange juice and the zest of one orange with the vanilla. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 2 tablespoons milk and 2 tablespoons Cointreau. Pour glaze over cooled cookies.

Vanilla Bean: Replace vanilla extract with vanilla bean paste. Omit almond extract. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 3 tablespoons milk and 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste. Pour glaze over the cooled cookies.

Where do you stand on the great madeleine debate? Do you consider them cookies or cake?


How to Make Madeleines

Melt 10 tablespoons butter over medium heat. (Leave the remaining 2 tablespoons on the counter to come to room temperature. Set aside for the pan.) Cook butter over medium-low, stirring frequently, while it foams and bubbles. After about 5 minutes, the butter will darken and you&rsquoll see particles on the bottom of the pan. Once these become golden or light brown, remove the pan from the heat and pour butter into a heat-proof container. Let cool.

Whisk sifted flour, salt, and baking powder together. Set aside.

Beat eggs and sugar together with an electric mixer on medium-high speed for about 6&ndash8 minutes, or until thickened and pale yellow. Beat in the extracts.

Gently fold in half of the flour mixture. Fold in the butter. Add the remaining flour and fold gently until incorporated. Place bowl in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 375ºF. Use a pastry brush to coat the Madeleine tin cavities completely. Flour the pans, tapping out the excess.

Do not stir the batter after removing from the refrigerator. Place a heaping tablespoon of batter into each prepared cavity. Do not spread. Place in the oven and lower the temperature to 350ºF. Bake for 12 minutes or until the cookies bounce back when lightly pressed.

Remove from oven and place a wire rack upside-down on top of the pan. With oven mitts, grab the pan and cooling rack and flip, giving the pan a few good shakes. Remove the pan, and the cookies should release.

If baking in batches, return the dough to the refrigerator between batches. Wash the pan with cool water and re-butter and flour the pan.

Store cooled madeleines in an airtight container, layering with waxed paper, for several days.

Are they cookies? Are they tiny cakes? (I&rsquom having flashbacks of Fig Newton commercials now.) I think of madeleines as cake-like cookies: pillow-y with a beautiful crumb, delicate but sturdy enough for a glaze or a dip in melted chocolate.

I love everything about them from the taste, to the shape, to the texture, to the spelling of the name. Does Madeleine remind anyone of a little French girl who lived in a house in Paris covered in vines?

Madeleines are a bit fussy to make, but not difficult at all. The fussiness comes from needing a special pan and browning the butter for the batter. That pan gives madeleines their signature scalloped shape, and the brown butter adds more flavor than just melted butter.

Speaking of brown butter, I tend to call mine &ldquogolden butter.&rdquo I don&rsquot like it to get too, too dark, but it still has that nutty, rich flavor.

As for the flavor of the madeleines, the sky&rsquos the limit. More traditional madeleines are vanilla or citrus flavored. My favorite is a vanilla-almond one.

You&rsquoll find them frequently dusted with powdered sugar, but don&rsquot be afraid to add a thin glaze. Just don&rsquot cover up those gorgeous scallops!

While the butter is cooling, you&rsquoll whisk the dry ingredients together.

The eggs get beaten with the sugar for several minutes until they&rsquore light in color and thickened.

The butter and flour mixture get gently folded in, and then the batter rests in the refrigerator for a bit. Because of the gentle folding so as not to lose the airiness, the rest in the fridge is a good chance for the flour to absorb the liquid. Madeleines are known for having a &ldquobump,&rdquo and the refrigeration helps to achieve that as well.

A bit about the bump: if your madeleines don&rsquot have them, don&rsquot worry! They taste EXACTLY the same. The texture is exactly the same.

Plus, the bump is on what is the back of the cookie. What&rsquos really important is that scallop on the front.

Before bringing the batter out of the fridge, prepare your pan. Just like with a Bundt pan, greasing every little millimeter of it is important. I also flour the pan after I&rsquove buttered it.

See how the batter has thickened and poofed a little in the fridge? Don&rsquot stir it. Just start scooping.

Dollop a heaping tablespoon of chilled batter into each prepared cavity. No need to spread the batter it&rsquoll spread perfectly in the oven.

Once cooled, dust with powdered sugar.

Dipping them in chocolate is always a good option in my book!

Melt chocolate and dip half of each cookie. Place on a waxed paper-lined cookie sheet to set in the refrigerator.

Madeleines may be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a few days.

The recipe for vanilla-almond madeleines follows, but here are a few variations:

Lemon: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon lemon juice and the zest of one lemon with the vanilla.

Orange Liqueur-Glazed: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon orange juice and the zest of one orange with the vanilla. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 2 tablespoons milk and 2 tablespoons Cointreau. Pour glaze over cooled cookies.

Vanilla Bean: Replace vanilla extract with vanilla bean paste. Omit almond extract. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 3 tablespoons milk and 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste. Pour glaze over the cooled cookies.

Where do you stand on the great madeleine debate? Do you consider them cookies or cake?


How to Make Madeleines

Melt 10 tablespoons butter over medium heat. (Leave the remaining 2 tablespoons on the counter to come to room temperature. Set aside for the pan.) Cook butter over medium-low, stirring frequently, while it foams and bubbles. After about 5 minutes, the butter will darken and you&rsquoll see particles on the bottom of the pan. Once these become golden or light brown, remove the pan from the heat and pour butter into a heat-proof container. Let cool.

Whisk sifted flour, salt, and baking powder together. Set aside.

Beat eggs and sugar together with an electric mixer on medium-high speed for about 6&ndash8 minutes, or until thickened and pale yellow. Beat in the extracts.

Gently fold in half of the flour mixture. Fold in the butter. Add the remaining flour and fold gently until incorporated. Place bowl in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 375ºF. Use a pastry brush to coat the Madeleine tin cavities completely. Flour the pans, tapping out the excess.

Do not stir the batter after removing from the refrigerator. Place a heaping tablespoon of batter into each prepared cavity. Do not spread. Place in the oven and lower the temperature to 350ºF. Bake for 12 minutes or until the cookies bounce back when lightly pressed.

Remove from oven and place a wire rack upside-down on top of the pan. With oven mitts, grab the pan and cooling rack and flip, giving the pan a few good shakes. Remove the pan, and the cookies should release.

If baking in batches, return the dough to the refrigerator between batches. Wash the pan with cool water and re-butter and flour the pan.

Store cooled madeleines in an airtight container, layering with waxed paper, for several days.

Are they cookies? Are they tiny cakes? (I&rsquom having flashbacks of Fig Newton commercials now.) I think of madeleines as cake-like cookies: pillow-y with a beautiful crumb, delicate but sturdy enough for a glaze or a dip in melted chocolate.

I love everything about them from the taste, to the shape, to the texture, to the spelling of the name. Does Madeleine remind anyone of a little French girl who lived in a house in Paris covered in vines?

Madeleines are a bit fussy to make, but not difficult at all. The fussiness comes from needing a special pan and browning the butter for the batter. That pan gives madeleines their signature scalloped shape, and the brown butter adds more flavor than just melted butter.

Speaking of brown butter, I tend to call mine &ldquogolden butter.&rdquo I don&rsquot like it to get too, too dark, but it still has that nutty, rich flavor.

As for the flavor of the madeleines, the sky&rsquos the limit. More traditional madeleines are vanilla or citrus flavored. My favorite is a vanilla-almond one.

You&rsquoll find them frequently dusted with powdered sugar, but don&rsquot be afraid to add a thin glaze. Just don&rsquot cover up those gorgeous scallops!

While the butter is cooling, you&rsquoll whisk the dry ingredients together.

The eggs get beaten with the sugar for several minutes until they&rsquore light in color and thickened.

The butter and flour mixture get gently folded in, and then the batter rests in the refrigerator for a bit. Because of the gentle folding so as not to lose the airiness, the rest in the fridge is a good chance for the flour to absorb the liquid. Madeleines are known for having a &ldquobump,&rdquo and the refrigeration helps to achieve that as well.

A bit about the bump: if your madeleines don&rsquot have them, don&rsquot worry! They taste EXACTLY the same. The texture is exactly the same.

Plus, the bump is on what is the back of the cookie. What&rsquos really important is that scallop on the front.

Before bringing the batter out of the fridge, prepare your pan. Just like with a Bundt pan, greasing every little millimeter of it is important. I also flour the pan after I&rsquove buttered it.

See how the batter has thickened and poofed a little in the fridge? Don&rsquot stir it. Just start scooping.

Dollop a heaping tablespoon of chilled batter into each prepared cavity. No need to spread the batter it&rsquoll spread perfectly in the oven.

Once cooled, dust with powdered sugar.

Dipping them in chocolate is always a good option in my book!

Melt chocolate and dip half of each cookie. Place on a waxed paper-lined cookie sheet to set in the refrigerator.

Madeleines may be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a few days.

The recipe for vanilla-almond madeleines follows, but here are a few variations:

Lemon: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon lemon juice and the zest of one lemon with the vanilla.

Orange Liqueur-Glazed: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon orange juice and the zest of one orange with the vanilla. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 2 tablespoons milk and 2 tablespoons Cointreau. Pour glaze over cooled cookies.

Vanilla Bean: Replace vanilla extract with vanilla bean paste. Omit almond extract. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 3 tablespoons milk and 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste. Pour glaze over the cooled cookies.

Where do you stand on the great madeleine debate? Do you consider them cookies or cake?


How to Make Madeleines

Melt 10 tablespoons butter over medium heat. (Leave the remaining 2 tablespoons on the counter to come to room temperature. Set aside for the pan.) Cook butter over medium-low, stirring frequently, while it foams and bubbles. After about 5 minutes, the butter will darken and you&rsquoll see particles on the bottom of the pan. Once these become golden or light brown, remove the pan from the heat and pour butter into a heat-proof container. Let cool.

Whisk sifted flour, salt, and baking powder together. Set aside.

Beat eggs and sugar together with an electric mixer on medium-high speed for about 6&ndash8 minutes, or until thickened and pale yellow. Beat in the extracts.

Gently fold in half of the flour mixture. Fold in the butter. Add the remaining flour and fold gently until incorporated. Place bowl in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 375ºF. Use a pastry brush to coat the Madeleine tin cavities completely. Flour the pans, tapping out the excess.

Do not stir the batter after removing from the refrigerator. Place a heaping tablespoon of batter into each prepared cavity. Do not spread. Place in the oven and lower the temperature to 350ºF. Bake for 12 minutes or until the cookies bounce back when lightly pressed.

Remove from oven and place a wire rack upside-down on top of the pan. With oven mitts, grab the pan and cooling rack and flip, giving the pan a few good shakes. Remove the pan, and the cookies should release.

If baking in batches, return the dough to the refrigerator between batches. Wash the pan with cool water and re-butter and flour the pan.

Store cooled madeleines in an airtight container, layering with waxed paper, for several days.

Are they cookies? Are they tiny cakes? (I&rsquom having flashbacks of Fig Newton commercials now.) I think of madeleines as cake-like cookies: pillow-y with a beautiful crumb, delicate but sturdy enough for a glaze or a dip in melted chocolate.

I love everything about them from the taste, to the shape, to the texture, to the spelling of the name. Does Madeleine remind anyone of a little French girl who lived in a house in Paris covered in vines?

Madeleines are a bit fussy to make, but not difficult at all. The fussiness comes from needing a special pan and browning the butter for the batter. That pan gives madeleines their signature scalloped shape, and the brown butter adds more flavor than just melted butter.

Speaking of brown butter, I tend to call mine &ldquogolden butter.&rdquo I don&rsquot like it to get too, too dark, but it still has that nutty, rich flavor.

As for the flavor of the madeleines, the sky&rsquos the limit. More traditional madeleines are vanilla or citrus flavored. My favorite is a vanilla-almond one.

You&rsquoll find them frequently dusted with powdered sugar, but don&rsquot be afraid to add a thin glaze. Just don&rsquot cover up those gorgeous scallops!

While the butter is cooling, you&rsquoll whisk the dry ingredients together.

The eggs get beaten with the sugar for several minutes until they&rsquore light in color and thickened.

The butter and flour mixture get gently folded in, and then the batter rests in the refrigerator for a bit. Because of the gentle folding so as not to lose the airiness, the rest in the fridge is a good chance for the flour to absorb the liquid. Madeleines are known for having a &ldquobump,&rdquo and the refrigeration helps to achieve that as well.

A bit about the bump: if your madeleines don&rsquot have them, don&rsquot worry! They taste EXACTLY the same. The texture is exactly the same.

Plus, the bump is on what is the back of the cookie. What&rsquos really important is that scallop on the front.

Before bringing the batter out of the fridge, prepare your pan. Just like with a Bundt pan, greasing every little millimeter of it is important. I also flour the pan after I&rsquove buttered it.

See how the batter has thickened and poofed a little in the fridge? Don&rsquot stir it. Just start scooping.

Dollop a heaping tablespoon of chilled batter into each prepared cavity. No need to spread the batter it&rsquoll spread perfectly in the oven.

Once cooled, dust with powdered sugar.

Dipping them in chocolate is always a good option in my book!

Melt chocolate and dip half of each cookie. Place on a waxed paper-lined cookie sheet to set in the refrigerator.

Madeleines may be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a few days.

The recipe for vanilla-almond madeleines follows, but here are a few variations:

Lemon: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon lemon juice and the zest of one lemon with the vanilla.

Orange Liqueur-Glazed: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon orange juice and the zest of one orange with the vanilla. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 2 tablespoons milk and 2 tablespoons Cointreau. Pour glaze over cooled cookies.

Vanilla Bean: Replace vanilla extract with vanilla bean paste. Omit almond extract. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 3 tablespoons milk and 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste. Pour glaze over the cooled cookies.

Where do you stand on the great madeleine debate? Do you consider them cookies or cake?


How to Make Madeleines

Melt 10 tablespoons butter over medium heat. (Leave the remaining 2 tablespoons on the counter to come to room temperature. Set aside for the pan.) Cook butter over medium-low, stirring frequently, while it foams and bubbles. After about 5 minutes, the butter will darken and you&rsquoll see particles on the bottom of the pan. Once these become golden or light brown, remove the pan from the heat and pour butter into a heat-proof container. Let cool.

Whisk sifted flour, salt, and baking powder together. Set aside.

Beat eggs and sugar together with an electric mixer on medium-high speed for about 6&ndash8 minutes, or until thickened and pale yellow. Beat in the extracts.

Gently fold in half of the flour mixture. Fold in the butter. Add the remaining flour and fold gently until incorporated. Place bowl in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 375ºF. Use a pastry brush to coat the Madeleine tin cavities completely. Flour the pans, tapping out the excess.

Do not stir the batter after removing from the refrigerator. Place a heaping tablespoon of batter into each prepared cavity. Do not spread. Place in the oven and lower the temperature to 350ºF. Bake for 12 minutes or until the cookies bounce back when lightly pressed.

Remove from oven and place a wire rack upside-down on top of the pan. With oven mitts, grab the pan and cooling rack and flip, giving the pan a few good shakes. Remove the pan, and the cookies should release.

If baking in batches, return the dough to the refrigerator between batches. Wash the pan with cool water and re-butter and flour the pan.

Store cooled madeleines in an airtight container, layering with waxed paper, for several days.

Are they cookies? Are they tiny cakes? (I&rsquom having flashbacks of Fig Newton commercials now.) I think of madeleines as cake-like cookies: pillow-y with a beautiful crumb, delicate but sturdy enough for a glaze or a dip in melted chocolate.

I love everything about them from the taste, to the shape, to the texture, to the spelling of the name. Does Madeleine remind anyone of a little French girl who lived in a house in Paris covered in vines?

Madeleines are a bit fussy to make, but not difficult at all. The fussiness comes from needing a special pan and browning the butter for the batter. That pan gives madeleines their signature scalloped shape, and the brown butter adds more flavor than just melted butter.

Speaking of brown butter, I tend to call mine &ldquogolden butter.&rdquo I don&rsquot like it to get too, too dark, but it still has that nutty, rich flavor.

As for the flavor of the madeleines, the sky&rsquos the limit. More traditional madeleines are vanilla or citrus flavored. My favorite is a vanilla-almond one.

You&rsquoll find them frequently dusted with powdered sugar, but don&rsquot be afraid to add a thin glaze. Just don&rsquot cover up those gorgeous scallops!

While the butter is cooling, you&rsquoll whisk the dry ingredients together.

The eggs get beaten with the sugar for several minutes until they&rsquore light in color and thickened.

The butter and flour mixture get gently folded in, and then the batter rests in the refrigerator for a bit. Because of the gentle folding so as not to lose the airiness, the rest in the fridge is a good chance for the flour to absorb the liquid. Madeleines are known for having a &ldquobump,&rdquo and the refrigeration helps to achieve that as well.

A bit about the bump: if your madeleines don&rsquot have them, don&rsquot worry! They taste EXACTLY the same. The texture is exactly the same.

Plus, the bump is on what is the back of the cookie. What&rsquos really important is that scallop on the front.

Before bringing the batter out of the fridge, prepare your pan. Just like with a Bundt pan, greasing every little millimeter of it is important. I also flour the pan after I&rsquove buttered it.

See how the batter has thickened and poofed a little in the fridge? Don&rsquot stir it. Just start scooping.

Dollop a heaping tablespoon of chilled batter into each prepared cavity. No need to spread the batter it&rsquoll spread perfectly in the oven.

Once cooled, dust with powdered sugar.

Dipping them in chocolate is always a good option in my book!

Melt chocolate and dip half of each cookie. Place on a waxed paper-lined cookie sheet to set in the refrigerator.

Madeleines may be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a few days.

The recipe for vanilla-almond madeleines follows, but here are a few variations:

Lemon: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon lemon juice and the zest of one lemon with the vanilla.

Orange Liqueur-Glazed: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon orange juice and the zest of one orange with the vanilla. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 2 tablespoons milk and 2 tablespoons Cointreau. Pour glaze over cooled cookies.

Vanilla Bean: Replace vanilla extract with vanilla bean paste. Omit almond extract. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 3 tablespoons milk and 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste. Pour glaze over the cooled cookies.

Where do you stand on the great madeleine debate? Do you consider them cookies or cake?


How to Make Madeleines

Melt 10 tablespoons butter over medium heat. (Leave the remaining 2 tablespoons on the counter to come to room temperature. Set aside for the pan.) Cook butter over medium-low, stirring frequently, while it foams and bubbles. After about 5 minutes, the butter will darken and you&rsquoll see particles on the bottom of the pan. Once these become golden or light brown, remove the pan from the heat and pour butter into a heat-proof container. Let cool.

Whisk sifted flour, salt, and baking powder together. Set aside.

Beat eggs and sugar together with an electric mixer on medium-high speed for about 6&ndash8 minutes, or until thickened and pale yellow. Beat in the extracts.

Gently fold in half of the flour mixture. Fold in the butter. Add the remaining flour and fold gently until incorporated. Place bowl in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 375ºF. Use a pastry brush to coat the Madeleine tin cavities completely. Flour the pans, tapping out the excess.

Do not stir the batter after removing from the refrigerator. Place a heaping tablespoon of batter into each prepared cavity. Do not spread. Place in the oven and lower the temperature to 350ºF. Bake for 12 minutes or until the cookies bounce back when lightly pressed.

Remove from oven and place a wire rack upside-down on top of the pan. With oven mitts, grab the pan and cooling rack and flip, giving the pan a few good shakes. Remove the pan, and the cookies should release.

If baking in batches, return the dough to the refrigerator between batches. Wash the pan with cool water and re-butter and flour the pan.

Store cooled madeleines in an airtight container, layering with waxed paper, for several days.

Are they cookies? Are they tiny cakes? (I&rsquom having flashbacks of Fig Newton commercials now.) I think of madeleines as cake-like cookies: pillow-y with a beautiful crumb, delicate but sturdy enough for a glaze or a dip in melted chocolate.

I love everything about them from the taste, to the shape, to the texture, to the spelling of the name. Does Madeleine remind anyone of a little French girl who lived in a house in Paris covered in vines?

Madeleines are a bit fussy to make, but not difficult at all. The fussiness comes from needing a special pan and browning the butter for the batter. That pan gives madeleines their signature scalloped shape, and the brown butter adds more flavor than just melted butter.

Speaking of brown butter, I tend to call mine &ldquogolden butter.&rdquo I don&rsquot like it to get too, too dark, but it still has that nutty, rich flavor.

As for the flavor of the madeleines, the sky&rsquos the limit. More traditional madeleines are vanilla or citrus flavored. My favorite is a vanilla-almond one.

You&rsquoll find them frequently dusted with powdered sugar, but don&rsquot be afraid to add a thin glaze. Just don&rsquot cover up those gorgeous scallops!

While the butter is cooling, you&rsquoll whisk the dry ingredients together.

The eggs get beaten with the sugar for several minutes until they&rsquore light in color and thickened.

The butter and flour mixture get gently folded in, and then the batter rests in the refrigerator for a bit. Because of the gentle folding so as not to lose the airiness, the rest in the fridge is a good chance for the flour to absorb the liquid. Madeleines are known for having a &ldquobump,&rdquo and the refrigeration helps to achieve that as well.

A bit about the bump: if your madeleines don&rsquot have them, don&rsquot worry! They taste EXACTLY the same. The texture is exactly the same.

Plus, the bump is on what is the back of the cookie. What&rsquos really important is that scallop on the front.

Before bringing the batter out of the fridge, prepare your pan. Just like with a Bundt pan, greasing every little millimeter of it is important. I also flour the pan after I&rsquove buttered it.

See how the batter has thickened and poofed a little in the fridge? Don&rsquot stir it. Just start scooping.

Dollop a heaping tablespoon of chilled batter into each prepared cavity. No need to spread the batter it&rsquoll spread perfectly in the oven.

Once cooled, dust with powdered sugar.

Dipping them in chocolate is always a good option in my book!

Melt chocolate and dip half of each cookie. Place on a waxed paper-lined cookie sheet to set in the refrigerator.

Madeleines may be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a few days.

The recipe for vanilla-almond madeleines follows, but here are a few variations:

Lemon: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon lemon juice and the zest of one lemon with the vanilla.

Orange Liqueur-Glazed: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon. Omit almond extract. Add 1 tablespoon orange juice and the zest of one orange with the vanilla. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 2 tablespoons milk and 2 tablespoons Cointreau. Pour glaze over cooled cookies.

Vanilla Bean: Replace vanilla extract with vanilla bean paste. Omit almond extract. Make glaze: whisk 1 cup powdered sugar with 3 tablespoons milk and 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste. Pour glaze over the cooled cookies.

Where do you stand on the great madeleine debate? Do you consider them cookies or cake?