Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Parisian Hotel Dining Decadence

Parisian Hotel Dining Decadence

Located in the most glamorous cities and some of the most exotic locations in the world, Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts are not only known for their luxurious accommodations but also their fine dining. Eight Four Seasons’ restaurants have been awarded at least one Michelin star, including their restaurant in Paris, Le Cinq. Le Cinq is the two-Michelin-starred restaurant located in Paris’ Four Seasons George V. This classically French restaurant led by executive chef Eric Briffard is the epitome of luxury dining in a city filled with discerning tastes.

With its extremely attentive service, Le Cinq is a place to linger over three-hour lunches and where Louis Vuitton handbags are given their own little stool to sit on. In the dining room, crystal chandeliers illuminate flawless floral arrangements created by artistic director and designer to the stars Jeff Leatham, pristine white tablecloths don’t have so much as a crumb, much less a wrinkle, and floor-to-ceiling windows with heavy drapes frame the view into the famous George V courtyard.

The attention paid to the atmosphere is exceeded only by Le Cinq’s menu. Two rounds of amuse bouche and wine parings are just the beginning. Entrées like the milk-fed lamb shoulder from the Aveyron region in France is cooked for 17 hours and serves two extremely hungry people. Not simply delivered from the kitchen to diners on plates, the succulent lamb is carved at the table and spooned with au jus. The entire process is akin to watching live theater.

Additional enticement comes in the form of three carts located in the Le Cinq dining room, for champagne, candy, and cheese. The term "cart" probably doesn't do them justice, though; it would be like calling a Rolls Royce a "car." Nonetheless, the champagne cart contains at least five varieties of the famous French bubbly and is presented as patrons are seated.

What Notre Dame is to Catholics, Le Cinq is to turophiles — there’s no place more holy for those that kneel at the altar of cheese. With its seasonal selections, the cheese cart is paraded around the dining room tempting patrons with its multiple varieties from the cheese experts.

The dessert cart is filled with candied fruit dipped in chocolate, fudge filled with fruits and nuts, homemade marshmallow rope cut at the table, real pineapple lollipops surrounded in marshmallow, and countless other divine choices. This diabetic coma on wheels will prompt the question, "Who the heck is Willy Wonka?"

Dining at Le Cinq is exactly what one would expect in arguably the finest hotel in the most glamorous city in the world. Le Cinq is nirvana for those looking to indulge in a decedent meal in the City of Light.


Chocolate Decadence Cake Recipe

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Line a 9-inch springform pan with parchment paper. Grease the parchment paper and sprinkle it lightly with sugar.

Melt butter and the chocolate, stirring often, in the top of a double boiler over hot water. Remove from the heat and let cool slightly.

Learn different techniques for How To Melt Chocolate.

Whisk in the egg yolks, one at a time, incorporating well after each addition. Whisk in the vanilla extract.

In a large bowl, mix together the sugar, salt, and cocoa powder together then whisk into the melted chocolate mixture.

Pour the egg whites into another clean mixing bowl and whip until soft peaks are formed. Gently fold the egg whites into the chocolate batter, and then pour the mixture into the prepared springform pan.

Bake the cake for about 40 minutes or just until the center is firm. Cake is done when the internal temperature registers approximately 205 to 209 degrees F. on your cooking thermometer.

Remove from oven. Do not worry about cracks around the edges. Let the cake cool in the pan for about 15 minutes. Run a small knife around the edge of the cake to loosen it. Place a plate over the top of the cake and, holding it firmly, invert the cake onto the plate. Remove the pan and remove the parchment paper from the bottom of the cake.

Pour the warm Chocolate Glaze over the cake. Using a metal spatula, smooth the glaze over the top and around the sides of the cake. Refrigerate until the glaze has set.

To serve, slice and place the cake on dessert plates. Garnish with Caramel Sauce and Candied Nuts.


Learning To Love Food Like A Parisian

Despite being a former BBC TV cooking show host, an author of 15 cookbooks and a recipe writer for the French version of Elle, Trish Deseine insists that she isn’t a professional. “I’m not a chef, I’m a home cook,” Deseine says.

Yet, her practical and colorful attitude toward food is refreshing and has drawn many culinary followers. In her latest book, The Paris Gourmet, which came out in September, Deseine dishes on the Paris dining scene and shares her tips for Gallic cuisine and entertaining. She’s not a fan of “trophy eating,” where everything at restaurants tends to happen only on the plate and the social side is lost to an online experience echoing an “I was here” attitude rather than one that happens around the table.

According to Deseine, who has lived in Paris for almost 30 years, restaurateurs are constantly trying to outdo one another. They latch on to the latest trend but find that they are outdated within a year. Right now, it’s all about being a “Brooklyn copycat,” she says. Before it was about going to organic coffee shops prior to that, it was about the bistronomie movement. “Bistronomie was a huge injection of energy in the Paris food scene — but the problem is that nothing’s happened since,” Deseine says.

Shedding the media hype that surrounds Paris’ dining scene, the foodie says one of her go-to spots is Le Royal Monceau – Raffles Paris for brunch. For lunch, she suggests Le Meurice’s Le Dalí, which centers on refined French terroir. “The cooking is masterful and it’s using very simple ingredients,” she says. She also likes Jean-François Piège’s restaurant at Hôtel Thoumieux. A fun place for the “institution Parisienne,” as Deseine calls it, is Hôtel Costes, and she highly recommends Monsieur Bleu. For dinner, her all-time favorite seasonal ingredient is truffle, especially at Pierre Gagnaire.

While it’s obvious that Deseine has a deep appreciation for fine-dining restaurants, Deseine herself illustrates that more attention should be paid on those who cook every day regardless of time, mood or resources — those who cook because they have a passion to do so.

“More value needs to be given to repetition, to ritual eating is a habit that we do mostly as a family that is not highlighted enough,” Deseine says.

A great part of her concentration is on an effort-time ratio for cooking as well as when she is choosing a restaurant — you certainly won’t find her waiting in line for hours at a food truck for a pastrami sandwich. In 2010, her crusade for a more down-to-earth food attitude landed her a place in Vogue Paris’ list of “40 Women of the Decade.”

She shares more of her food philosophy in Paris Gourmet. Innovative, comforting, fun and accessible, it is Deseine’s third title for the English-speaking market (though many of her French books have been translated into various languages). It’s a welcoming initiation to Parisian culture via its food scene. Deseine’s personal descriptions provide a quick and accurate idea of the different restaurants for first-timers. The book also serves as a guide to a thoughtfully put-together selection of spots that are fully deserving of our attention.

And the book goes even further with sections on the various facets of French culinary culture, such as tableware, a breakdown of luxury “palace” hotel restaurants, different gourmet tours of the city worth trying and recipes for the home cook. Going to the market is another crucial part of French dining that subsists even in Paris and that is all too often neglected by food writers. Deseine includes insider tips for market shopping, as well as a list of her top markets (of which there are nearly 100 in Paris alone).

While she may focus on the Parisian food scene, Deseine is a global gourmand. In terms of the ultimate food tour, London tops her list. “It’s got it all — the decadence, the glamour,” she says. Deseine also loves the culinary scenes in Copenhagen and San Sebastián. Her latest discovery is her hometown of Belfast. She says it has evolved beyond recognition. “I have discovered a completely new edge.”


Tarte Tatin: The Recipe

The recipe of Tarte Tatin is so concise that, unusually, I can actually include the recipe here.

Behold: Preheat oven to 180/375. Peel and slice apples into 1-2 cm thick slices. Rub butter all over the bottom of a sauté pan (preferably a cast-iron one). Scatter brown sugar atop the buttered pan. Lay apple slices flat inside the buttery, sugar pan, in a pattern if you like, and as tightly as possible. Put on the burner. The butter and sugar will start to bubble around the apple slices, browning them. Scatter some cinnamon and a splash of brandy, rum or calvados (if you’re being authentic) atop the apple slices as they bubble.

Then lay pie dough over the apple slices, so they are covered, tucking the edges of the dough around the edges of the apples on the extremities of the pan. Let it cook a few minutes longer, now tented in dough. Then transfer the pan directly to the oven and cook until the top of the dough is nicely golden-browned. When it’s ready, remove from the oven and place an inverted plate over the tart. Then flip the whole thing over, so the tart ends up falling out of the pan, right-side-up, onto the plate. Voilà, you’re done!

This is one I’ve now made with my daughters, aged 2.5 and 4.5, which is a testament to how simple it is. I even make my own alternative varieties, caramelizing bananas and pears along with the apples. I call it Tart Charney. If only I can get a famous chef to write about going undercover to steal my recipe, we’ll really be onto something!


Hôtel de Crillon, A Rosewood Hotel: The French Capital's Newest Magnet For Entertainment

From breakfast through lunch, from tea time to an apéritif interlude, from cocktail hour to dinner and beyond, the eclectic restaurants and bars of the newly reopened Hôtel de Crillon, A Rosewood Hotel are attractions in their own right for a sophisticated clientele of Parisians, hotel guests and visitors to the capital.

L’Ecrin, Hôtel de Crillon’s gastronomic restaurant, will welcome a mere 28 guests per evening into the intimate 18th century décor of the Salon des Citronniers where they will savor the inventive and creative dishes of young Chef Christopher Hache, whose previous restaurant at the hotel earned a Michelin star. During the closure and transformation of Hôtel de Crillon, Hache spent a two-year sabbatical exploring new flavors, ingredients, and techniques with notable chefs throughout Asia and the Americas. He weaves those discoveries together with his French culinary savoir-faire to create the bold, surprising repertoire he presents at Hôtel de Crillon. L’Ecrin is open for dinner only.

A warm and convivial brasserie situated at the heart of the hotel, Brasserie d’Aumont is named for Hôtel de Crillon’s first resident, le duc d’Aumont. From breakfast to late-night, guests can enjoy an electric, quintessentially Parisian atmosphere while sampling refreshed brasserie classics prepared by Chef Justin Schmitt. Schmitt combines his appreciation of timeless French fare with talent, precision, and an exciting artistic touch. For example, Schmitt has a half-side of beef delivered each week from which he uses every single cut in his unique recipes. Brasserie d’Aumont seats 62 inside and 86 in the hotel’s al fresco courtyards. Brasserie d’Aument is open daily.

Set in one of Hôtel de Crillon’s most historic spaces, Jardin d’Hiver not only entices with a relaxing ambiance perfect for teatime or post-shopping pauses but also invites indulgence with exquisite sweets imagined by Jérôme Chaucesse, Executive Pastry Chef. Chaucesse holds the distinction of being a Meilleur Ouvrier de France, which is the ultimate recognition for his skill and creativity in the sweet art of pastry-making. He oversees all the desserts, chocolates, cakes, and confections served at Hôtel de Crillon. Jardin d’Hiver features coffee by specialists Café Coutume and a tea selection by renowned expert Lydia Gautier, as well as one of the hotel’s most emblematic historical objects, the famous Baccarat crystal and gilded bronze elephant liqueur dispenser presented at the 1878 World Fair in Paris. Jardin d’Hiver seats 33 people, with an additional 13 seats in the gallery. Jardin d’Hiver is open daily.

The 60-seat bar Les Ambassadeurs, with its impeccable selection of the three “C’s” – cocktails, champagne, and caviar – is the newest “see and be seen” venue in Paris. A festive vibe with a surprising touch of decadence animates the historical setting (the ceiling is a registered landmark), which includes live music nightly, meticulously crafted cocktails by Head Barman Christophe Davoine, and an exclusive carte of prestigious champagnes. Les Ambassadeurs is open daily.

An impressive yet intimate venue, La Cave holds Hôtel de Crillon’s impressive collection of fine and rare wines, including labels from the early 20th century. In total, the hotel has 40,000 bottles – 2,300 references from 16 countries. Up to 12 connoisseurs can gather in this secluded, subterranean space for tastings of special food-and-wine pairing dinners led by Chef Sommelier Xavier Thuizat, whose multi-sensorial approach helps guests discover and appreciate the infinite nuances – colors, tastes, and bouquets – of fine wines and spirits. La Cave is open daily from late afternoon to 1 a.m.

L’Etincelle is a 24-hour exclusive, private cigar lounge of only 28 members, perfect for the modern epicure who seeks out the finest spirits, superb chocolates, and, of course, the rarest and most well-preserved cigars. Ten people can be seated inside, with eight outside on the Cour Gabriel terrace.

About Hôtel de Crillon, A Rosewood Hotel

Fronted by the majestic architecture of Ange-Jacques Gabriel, Hôtel de Crillon, A Rosewood Hotel faces the spectacular Place de la Concorde, one of the most beautiful city-squares in the world. Built at Louis XV’s request, the hotel became the residence of the illustrious Count de Crillon and his family for many years and was transformed into a hotel in 1909 under the guidance of architect Walter-André Destailleur. Since then, its guest list has featured celebrities, politicians, artists, princes and queens, all attracted to the hotel’s unique and perennial reputation for excellence. Hôtel de Crillon has long since secured its iconic status as a one-of-a-kind property, a living testament to the very best way of life France has to offer. Following a four-year transformation, the hotel opened in 2017 featuring 124 guestrooms and suites four restaurants Sense, A Rosewood Spa a newly created swimming pool three heritage landmark salons for meetings and functions, and more.

About Rosewood Hotels & Resort

Rosewood Hotels & Resorts® manages 19 one-of-a-kind luxury properties in 11 countries, with 17 new hotels under development. Each Rosewood hotel embraces the brand’s A Sense of Place® philosophy to reflect the individual location’s history, culture and sensibilities. The Rosewood Hotels & Resorts collection includes some of the world’s most legendary hotels and resorts, including The Carlyle, A Rosewood Hotel in New York, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek in Dallas and Hôtel de Crillon, A Rosewood Hotel in Paris, as well as new classics such as Rosewood London. Rosewood Hotels & Resorts targets to double its number of hotels in operation by 2020.


Parisian Hotel Dining Decadence - Recipes

Chocolate lovers unite! Well, maybe that's a bit strong. If you didn't have a chocolate craving before you start playing the game. you'll probably be dreaming of a chocolate fountain before too long! This is for the most part an easy paced strategy game that lets you be creative.

There are 2 major tasks in this game. Get the Baumeister Chocolates family business running and making a profit again post WWII by getting the current Baumeister Board Members endorsements. And to find Alex Fletcher's (who has to had to hand the business over to you) husband who's never returned from the war. Now I'm off to purchase a chocolate fountain!


GENERAL TIPS AND HINTS:

• If you can't afford to travel or don't want to travel and need to make the day/s advance while staying in one port purchase a few of the least expensive products you'll use at the market. Do this several times and select "okay" each time to exit the market and the day/s will change after doing this several times.

• Talk, talk, talk. to everyone. Check the buildings at every port often to see what new things the characters have to say. You'll probably receive a/several new quest/s. Accept as many quests as you can. even if you'd make more profit by selling the items at a shop. Most quests lead to bigger and better things.

• You can scroll over the ingredients and get the price range/s of products you have purchased previously.

• Buy cheap and sell high when you can.

• BE CREATIVE! Use the Secret Test Kitchen to create your own recipes and to have success in this game. Your choice. create recipes with low cost ingredients for less overhead OR use the most expensive ingredients and gain a higher profit margin OR combine the low cost and high cost items.

• There is a new option in this game after fulfilling quite a few quests (when you receive the shop in Tangiers) to purchase a telegraph machine. This enables you to change the product the factories are producing without going to the factory and manually making the change. The only prerequisite is that the product had to be made there previously to set the production amount.

• Try to make new recipes as you receive them. more than likely you'll need at least a few cases. This also makes the telegraph more helpful when acquired.


Names and Locations: (alphabetical listing by last name) Name-Port-Location
Abillou, Jilali – Tangiers – Hotel Tangiers
Azula, Elian – Havana – Old Havana Market
Balarin, Luis – Lima – Alpamayo Peak
Barreda, Pedro – Bogota – Andes Mountains
Amiel, Florian – Zurich – University of Zurich
Astengo, Keylla – Lima – Plaza Mayor
Barzani, Shada – Baghdad – Al Rasheed Market
Baumeister, Chas – San Francisco – San Francisco Chocolate Makers
Baumeister, Deiter – Tokyo – Honmei Industries
Baumeister, Evangeline – San Francisco – Baumeister Confections
Baumeister, Felix – Cape Town – Cape Town Manufacturing, LTD.
Baumeister, Teddy – Reykjavik – Secret Test Kitchen
Baumeister, Whitney – Wellington – New Zealand Confectioners, LTD.
Birchmore, Syd – travels – none
Bragger, Nino – Zurich – Swiss National Bank
Calvino, Agostina – travels – none
Caraballa, Armena – Havana – Vedado Chocolates and Coffees
Carpo, Katherine – travels – ends in the Falkland Islands
de Guines, Lolita – Havana – Hotel de Cuba
Devi, Santoro - Bali – Kintamani Plantation
Didharma, Trishana – Bali – Mangku's Sweets
Donders, Anselm – Zurich –Bahnhof
Elquez, Claudia – Las Vegas – Stan's Market
Equivel, Cambria – Xunantunich – Cambria's Place
Etame, Guy – Douala – Ndawara Plantation
Famosa, Cheena – Havana – Havana Coffee Beans LTD.
Fletcher, Alex – travels – none
Gaitain, Jorge – Bogota – Foothills Plantation
Gelder, Magdalene – Tangiers – Souk Market
Gilbraith, Abbey – Toronto – Bigtown Market
Gygax, Liridona – Zurich – St. Peterskirche
Haneda, Yuriko – travels – none
Hardy, Thomas – Tokyo – Mount Fuji
Hareda, Motochika – travels – none
Harrington, Pamela – travels – none
Helguson, Hjalmar – travels – none
Hlasek, Ursel – Zurich – Matterhorn
Hotz, Gavin – Cape Town – Victoria and Albert Waterfront Market
Hudstone, Brooke – Toronto – Ontario Manufacture
Isuneda, Reiko – Tokyo – Nakamise Market
Kamlaninui, Kalei – Kona – Ka'awa Loa Plantation
Kawai, Yoshi – Tokyo – Nakamitsu Fine Coffees and Sweets
Knowles, Sharon – San Francisco – Market Street Market
Kowaki – Uluru – Kowaki's Limes
Lafontaine, Rick – travels – none
Landinez, Transita – Bogota – Artesanias de Colombia
Layani, Ilani – Tangiers – Gibraltar Port
Llinas, Condela – Havana – Casino National
Loddington, Rufus – travels – none
Mackray, Edward – Falkland Islands – Boarding House
Makongue, Henri – Douala – Capital Sweets
Matibula, Kefilwe – Cape Town – Adderly Street Chocolate Shop
McGill, Valerie – travels – none
McMuntry, Helen - San Francisco – Union Square Chocolates
Mimboe, Ernest – travels – none
Morsalve, Antonio – Bogota – Mercado de San Alejo
Mudaliar, Shobha – travels – none
Naea, Leialoha – Kona – Kailua Fine Goods
Nama, Mariana – travels – none
Ndongo, Tomge – Douala – Eko Market
Nkosi, Duduzile – Cape Town – Table Mountain
Nyama – Gobi Desert – Nyma's Outpost
Nyoman – Bali – Agung Shadows Market
Parodi, Yussel – Lima – Miraflores Chocolates
Pepper, Allison – San Francisco – The Watering Hole
Pickstar, Sissy – travels – none
Pilipo, Hekili – Kona – Open Air Market
Quinn, Robyn – Wellington – Harbour Market
Rabiti, Bianca – Tangiers – The Lookout
Radhe, Karolyne – Wellington – Britannia Fine Goods
Ranceros, Ariana – Lima – Cathedral of Lima
Rast, Endrit – Zurich – Zurich Chocolate Works
Ransis, Analiese – Zurich – Niederorf Chocolates
Ribar, Zlata – Las Vegas – Golden Dollar
Sa'eed, Abrahem – Baghdad – Tigris River Coffees
Sato, Daisuke – Tokyo – Tokyo Station
Sinjari, Zenab – Baghdad – Abbasids Mosque
Siqueira, Surea – travels – none
Starks, Tyson – travels – none
Talib, Rahim – travels – none
Tangye, Joseph – Toronto – Waterfront Sweets
Tangye, Zachariah – Tangiers – Moroccan Fine Coffee
Taylor, Kerry – Toronto – Wychwood Sweets
Tooma, Salwa – travels – none
Tsuneda, Reiko – Tokyo – Nakamise Market
Vanegas, Susana – Bogota – La Catederal
Waipa, Oraona – travels – none
Watanabe, Kenje – Tokyo – Imperial Palace
Yamura, Asako – Tokyo – Tokyo Tower
Zandar, Giuliana – Lima – Mercado Aurora
Zubriggen, Verena – Zurich – Main Street Market

Alphabetical Listing of Ingredients and Locations
(Products become available at locations as you need them through out the game)

Allspice: Baghdad, Bali, Bogota, Havana
Almonds: Cape Town, Douala, Havana, San Francisco, Tangiers, Zurich
Amaretto: Las Vegas, Zurich
Anise: Baghdad, Douala
Balinese Cacao: Bali at the Kintamani Plantation
Balinese Coffee: Bali at the Kintamani Plantation
Blueberries: San Francisco, Tangiers, Toronto
Butter: Bogota, Toronto, Wellington
Cacao: Bali, Bogota, Douala, Kona, Toronto
Caramel: Cape Town, Zurich
Cardamom: Baghdad, Bali, Douala
Cashews: Bogota, Cape Town, Douala, Kona, Tangiers, Toronto
Cayenne Pepper: Douala, Wellington
Cherries: Kona, Lima, San Francisco, Tangiers, Tokyo, Wellington, Zurich
Cinnamon: Baghdad, Bali, Douala, Havana, Lima, Tangiers
Cloves: Baghdad, Bali, Bogota, Tangiers, Tokyo, Zurich
Coconut Milk: Bali
Coffee Liquor: Las Vegas, San Francisco
Colombian Cacao: Bogota at the Foothills Plantation
Colombian Coffee: Bogota at the Foothills Plantation
Cream: Kona, Toronto
Cuban Coffee: Havana at the Havana Coffee Beans, Ltd.
Currants: Douala, Wellington
Dates: Gobi Desert
Doualan Cacao: Douala at the Ndawara Plantation
Espresso: Baghdad, Bali, Bogota, Las Vegas, San Francisco, Toronto, Wellington, Zurich
Ginger: Bali, Douala, Tokyo
Hazelnuts: Bogota, Cape Town, Douala, Kona, Lima, Tangiers
Honduran Cacao: Xununtunich at Cambria's Place
Honey: Havana, Kona, Lima, Toronto, Zurich
Kona Coffee: Kona at the Ka'awa Loa Plantation
Lemons: Tokyo, Zurich
Limes: Uluru
Macadamia Nuts: Bali, Douala, Wellington
Mangos: Bali, Douala, Wellington
Maple Syrup: Toronto
Milk: Baghdad, Cape Town, Kona, Las Vegas, Lima, San Francisco, Tangiers, Tokyo, Toronto, Wellington, Zurich
Mint: Baghdad, Cape Town, Douala, Havana, Kona, San Francisco, Tangiers, Tokyo, Toronto, Wellington
Moroccan Coffee: Tangiers at the Souk Market
Nutmeg: Baghdad, Tangiers
Orange Liquor: Las Vegas
Oranges: Havana, Kona, Lima, Tangiers, Tokyo
Peanuts: Douala, Cape Town
Pecans: Bogota, Lima, Kona
Peruvian Cacao: Lima at the Mercado Aurora
Pistachios: Baghdad, San Francisco, Wellington
Pumpkins: Bogota, Tokyo, Wellington
Raspberries: Cape Town, San Francisco, Tangiers, Toronto, Wellington
Rose Petals: Zurich
Saffron: Baghdad, Bogota, Tangiers
Sea Salt: Bali, Tokyo, Wellington
Sesame Seeds: Tangiers
Strawberries: Las Vegas, Wellington
Sugar: Every port: Baghdad, Bali, Bogota, Cape Town, Douala, Gobi Desert, Havana, Kona, Las Vegas, Lima, San Francisco, Tangiers, Tokyo, Toronto, Uluru, Wellington, Xununtunich
Tea: Havana, Tokyo
Truffle Powder: Bali, Bogota, Douala, Havana, Kona, Lima
Vanilla: Douala, Kona, Wellington
Wasabi: Tokyo
Whipped Cream: Cape Town
Whiskey: Las Vegas, Toronto, Wellington, Zurich

RECIPIES
: (Recipe/Acquired by/Port/Location/Task)
Chocolate Bars: All recipes are given at the beginning of the game.
Your Creations: Recipes created by you in the Secret Test Kitchen in Reykjavik.

Coffees (in alphabetical order):
Arabian Bold: Given by Zachariah Tangye in Tangiers at Moroccan Fine Coffees for 40 cases of Arabian Bold.
Breakfast Blend: Given by Santoso Devi in Bali at the Kintamani Plantation for 10 cases each of 2 of "Your Creations".
Café con Leche: Given by Shobha Mudaliar, no specific location as she travels, for 24 cases of Café con Leche.
Coffee w/Amaretto: Given by Santoso Devi in Bali at the Kintamani Plantation for 10 cases each of 2 of "Your Creations".
Coffee w/Mint: Given by Zachariah Tangye in Tangiers at Moroccan Fine Coffee for delivery of 40 Arabian Bold.
Coffee w/Nutmeg: Given by Lolita de Guines in Havana at the Hotel de Cuba for 15 cases of Coffee w/Nutmeg.
Coffee w/Whipped Cream: Given by Agostina Calvino, no specific location as she travels for delivering 28 cases of Coffee w/Whipped Cream to Nino Bragger in Zurich at the Swiss National Bank.
Coffee with Cinnamon: Given by Ilan Layani in Tangiers at Gibraltar Port for preorder of 60 Caramel Bars given to Magdalene Gelder.
Cup A Joe: Given by Felix Baumeister in Cape Town at Cape Town Manufacturing just by visiting him.
Irish Coffee: Given by Lolita de Guines in Havana at the Hotel de Cuba for 15 Coffees w/Nutmeg and 15 Coffees w/whipped cream.
Mocha: Given by Florian Amiel in Zurich at the University of Zurich for 20 Cup A Joes.
Special Blend: Given by Ilan Layani in Tangiers at Gibraltar Port for 34 Special Reserve 66% African Cacao Bars.

Infusions: (alphabetical order)

Blended Cacao Infusions: Given by Ilan Layani in Tangiers at Gibraltar Port for 40 Mango Clove Infusions.
Dark Columbian Cacao Lime Infusions: Given by Susana Vanegas in Bogota at La Catederal for 25 cases of one of "Your Creations".
Dark Infusions w/Cherry: Given by Asako Yomura in Tokyo at Tokyo Tower for 45 Cinnamon Coffees and 45 Chocolate Bars w/Raspberry.
Dark Infusions w/Ginger: Given by Rahim Talib, no specific location (travels), for 26 Blueberry Infusions.
Mango Clove Infusions: Given by Ilan Layani in Tangiers at Gibraltar Port for 40 cases of Mango Clove Infusions.
Milk Chocolate Allspice Infusions: Given by Yoshi Kawai in Tokyo at Nakamitsu Fine Chocolates for 50 Milk Chocolate Allspice Infusions.
Milk Infusions w/Blueberry: Given by Asako Yomura in Tokyo at Tokyo Tower for 45 Cinnamon Coffees and 45 Chocolate Bars w/Raspberry.
Pecan Infusions: Given by Dieter Baumeister in Tokyo at Honmei Industries when you visit him.
Specialty Cacao Macadamia Infusions: Given by Susana Vanegas in Bogota at La Catederal for 45 Colombian Lime Infusions.
Spicy Dark Infusions: Given by Surea Siqueira in, no specific location (travels), for 75 cases of Spicy Dark Infusions.
Strawberry Anise Infusions: Given by Yuriko Haneda, no specific location (travels), for 100 Strawberries.
Vanilla Cinnamon Infusions: Given by Daisuke Sato in Tokyo at Tokyo Station for delivery of 50 Milk Allspice Infusions.

Truffles: (alphabetical order)
Blended Varietal Dark Truffles: Given by Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at Baumeister Confections after collecting 11 Truffle recipes.
Blended Varietal Pumpkin Truffles: Given by Joseph Tangye in Toronto at Waterfront Sweets for 1 Hazelnut Milk Truffles.
Cameroonian Truffles w/Saffron: Given by Whitney Baumeister in Wellington at New Zealand Confections for 1 Lemon Raspberry Truffle.
Hazelnut Milk Truffles: Given by Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at Baumeister Confections for 1 White Truffle.
Honey Milk Truffles: Given by Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at Baumeister Confections for 1 White Truffle.
Lemon Raspberry Truffles: Given by Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at Baumeister Confections for 1 White Truffle.
Peruvian Cardamom Nutmeg Truffles: Given by Alex Fletcher, no specific location (travels), for 1 Spicy Currant Truffle.
Sesame Ginger Columbian Truffles: Given by Deiter Baumeister in Tokyo at Honmei Industries for 1 Wasabi Cashew Truffle.
Specialty Espresso Truffles: Given by Felix Baumeister in Cape Town at Cape Town Manufacturing for 1 Honey Milk Truffles.
Spicy Currant Truffles: Given by Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at Baumeister Confections for 1 White Truffle.
Wasabi Cashew Truffles: Given by Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at Baumeister Confections for 1 White Truffle.
White Truffles: Given by Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at Baumeister Confections just for visiting.

Coffee Blends: (alphabetical order)
Café Caribe: Given by Agostina Calvino, no specific location (travels), when you're asked "feeling lucky today" answer yes.
Caramel Latte: Given by Abrahem Sa'eed in Baghdad at Tigris River Coffees for 50 Coffee w/Amaretto and 50 Pumpkin Latte.
Coconut Milk Coffee: Given by Motochika Haneda, no specific location (travels), for 35 each of 2 of your creations.
Coffee Grog: Given by Zenab Sinjari in Baghdad at Abbasids Mosque for 200 Caramel Latte.
Hazelnut Infused Coffee: Given by Joseph Tangye in Toronto at Waterfront Sweets for 20 cases of Hazelnut Infused Coffee for Felix Baumeister.
Mediterranean Coffee: Given by Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at Baumeister Confections for 25 cases of Mediterranean Coffee and 65 Sesame Ginger Colombian Cacao Truffles.
Mexican Coffee: Given by Joseph Tangye in Toronto at Waterfront Sweets for 11 Coffee Blend Recipes and $3,000,000.
Pumpkin Pie Latte: Given by Motochika Haneda, no specific location (travels), for 50 Pumpkin Latte and 50 Coffee w/Amaretto to Abrahem Sa'eed in Baghdad at Tigris River Coffees.
Spicy Blend: Given by Felix Baumeister in Cape Town at Cape Town Manufacturing for 20 Super Buzz, 20 Super Mocha Blend and 20 Hazelnut Infused Coffee Blend.
Super Buzz: Given by Joseph Tangye in Toronto at Waterfront Sweets for 1 Super Buzz order to Whitney Baumeister.
Super Mocha Blend: Given by Joseph Tangye in Toronto at Waterfront Sweets for 20 cases of Super Mocha Blend to Felix Baumeister in Cape Town at Cape Town Manufacturing.
Winter Warmer: Given by Felix Baumeister in Cape Town at Cape Town Manufacturing for 20 Super Buzz, 20 Super Mocha Blend and 20 Hazelnut Infused Coffee Blend.

Exotics: (alphabetical order)
Salted Dark Caramels: Given by Whitney Baumeister in Wellington at New Zealand Confections for 1 Super Buzz from Joseph Tangye.
Dark Dates w/Almonds: Given by Keylla Astango in Lima at Plaza Mayor for 50 Lemon Lime Stars.
Lemon Lime Stars: Given by Keylla Astango in Lima at Plaza Mayor for 60 Wasabi Cashew Truffles.
Chocolate Covered Rose Petals: Given by Motochika Haneda, no specific location (travels), for 35 cases each of your own creations.
Chocolate Covered Salted Pistachios: Given by Henri Makongue in Douala at Ndawara Plantation for 78 Mint and Whiskey Liqueurs.
Dark Honey Butter Crunch: Given by Susan Vanegas in Bogota at La Catederal for 12 Orange Pecan Stars and 12 Strawberry Anise Infusions.
Mint and Whiskey Liqueurs: Given by Claudia Elquez, in Las Vegas at Stan's Market for $25,000.
Sweet Chai Chocolate Stars: Given by Mariama Nana, no specific location (travels), for 50 Dark Dates w/Almonds.
Peanut Butter Stars: Given by Henri Makongue in Douala at Ndawara Plantation for 78 Mint and Whiskey Liqueurs.
Orange Pecan Stars: Given by Pedro Barreda in Bogota in the Andes Mountains for 25 Mediterranean Coffee and 65 Sesame Ginger Colombian Truffles.
Finest Chocolate Covered Strawberries: Given by Susana Vanegas in Bogota at La Catederal for 12 Orange Pecan Stars and 12 Strawberry Anise Infusions.
Blended Deep Chocolate w/Cashews: Given by Whitney Baumeister in Wellington at New Zealand Confections, LTD. for 11 Exotics recipes.

QUESTS: **SPOILER ALERT**

(Quests are not entirely linear and don't have to be accomplished in an exact order and you will probably have several quests simultaneously, however they do build upon each other.)

Special notes regarding Quests:

• The factories are in Zurich, Capetown, Tokyo, San Francisco, Toronto, & Wellington.

• The shops available for purchase are in Tangiers, Kona, Douala, Havana and Baghdad. The quest/s requirements to purchase these shops are pricey.

• The Moroccan Fine Coffee shop in Tangiers will purchase coffee products only.

• The Port Xunantunich doesn't become available until the game is almost completed and you own 5 shops and have endorsement from all the board members. The game can be completed without using or buying Honduran Cacao! No quest requires any recipes that use Honduran Cacao. if you believe it's required . you're probably looking at the recipe for Blended Varietal Dark Truffles It is the Blended Varietal Pumpkin Truffles that are required which have vertical brown and orange stripes. They are the first truffles on the left of the bottom row. There are recipes that use Honduran Cacao however they are not required to complete the game.

QUESTS:
"Your Creations" are recipes approved in the Secret Kitchen and in your recipe book. You need to fill all 12 slots to complete the game.

• Meeting Endrit Rast: Request by Alex Fletcher see Endrit Rast in Zurich at Zurich Chocolate Works and make 5 basic bars.

• Selling Chocolates: Request by Alex Fletcher. See Analiese Ransis at Niedorf Chocolates in Zurich and sell basic bars.

• Restocking Ingredients: Request by Analiese Ransis in Zurich at Niedorf Chocolates. Speak to Alex Fletcher per Analiese Ransis receive $5,000 and receive the sugar first quest.

• Sugar First: Request by Alex Fletcher. Talk to Verena Zubriggen at Main Street Market in Zurich

• Plenty of Sugar: Request by Alex Fletcher. Purchase enough sugar to have 200 sugars in inventory. Travel to Douala to purchase Cacao at Eko Market.

• Douala for Cacao/Cacao for Sale/Back to Alex: Request by Analiese Ransis in Zurich at Niedorf Chocolates. Purchase enough Cacao from Tomge Ndongo at Eko Market in Douala to have a minimum of 200 in inventory. Speak to Alex Fletcher in Zurich.

• Proving Yourself: Request by Alex Fletcher. Have $10,000 and make 1 case of Chocolate Caramel Bars to receive the promotion to CEO Candidate receive "You are Ready" quest.

• A New Recipe/Milk Chocolate: Request by Alex Fletcher. Talk to Verena Zubriggen in Zurich at Main Street Market and purchase milk for Milk Chocolate Bars. Make a minimum of 10 Milk Chocolate Bars.

• Bartering with Milk Chocolate: Request by Endrit Rast in Zurich at Zurich Chocolate Works. Take 10 Milk Chocolate Bars to Liridona Gygax in Zurich at St. Peterskirche. Receive $3,000 and 200 caramel sacks.

• Caramel Bars/Recycling: Request by Liridona Gygax in Zurich at St. Peterskirche. Make Caramel Bars and other bars of your choice sell chocolates to make $10,000 return to Alex Fletcher in Zurich.

• You are Ready: Request by Alex Fletcher. Talk with Felix Baumeister at Cape Town Manufacturing, LTD in Cape Town Amiel at the. Purchase peanuts.

• Peanuts, At Last/More Chocolate Bars with Peanuts: Request by Felix Baumeister in Cape Town at Cape Town Manufacturing. Take 20 Chocolate Bars with Peanuts to Florian Amiel at the University of Zurich in Zurich. Take 30 Chocolate Bars with Peanuts to Duduzile Nikosi in Cape Town at Table Mountain.

• An Order for Chocolate Bars with Almonds: Request by Liridona Gygax in Zurich at St. Peterskirche. Take 15 Chocolate Bars with Almonds to Liridona Gygax in Zurich at St. Peterskirche and receive $12,000. Purchase Mint.

• Too Much Sugar: Request by Gavin Hotz in Cape Town at Victoria and Albert Waterfront Market. Take 18 Mint Bars to Gavin Hotz in Cape Town at Victoria and Albert Waterfront Market and receive 1,000 sugars.

• Some Exciting News: Request by Nino Bragger in Zurich at Swiss National Bank. Talk to Felix Baumeister in Cape Town at Cape Town Manufacturing to receive access to the Secret Test Kitchen in Reykjavik.

• Pre-Paid Order: Request by Florian Amiel in Zurich at the University of Zurich. Take 32 Chocolate Lemon Bars to Ursel Hlasek in Zurich at the Matterhorn to receive $20,000.

• Getting Creative: Request by Teddy Baumeister in Reykjavk at the Secret Test Kitchen. Take a variety of ingredients and talk with Teddy Baumeister at the Secret Test Kitchen in Reykjavik. Make your first creation.

• Marketing Your First Creation: Request by Rick Lafontaine (travels). Take 10 of your First Creation to Niederdorf Chocolates in Zurich to receive $10,000.

• A Craving for Chocolate Bars with Lemon (optional): Request by Nino Bragger in Zurich at Swiss National Bank. Take 20 Chocolate Bars w/Lemon to Nino Bragger in Zurich at the Swiss National Bank and receive $15,000.

• A Friendly Gesture (optional): Request by Ursel Hlasek in Zurich at the Matterhorn. Take 11 Chocolate Bars w/Orange to Florian Amiel in Zurich at the University of Zurich.

• Simple Tastes (optional): Request by Anselm Donders in Zurich at Banhof. Take 40 Basic Chocolate Bars to Anselm Donders in Zurich at Bahnhof to receive $5,000.

• Varietal Cacao: Request by Guy Etame in Douala at Ndawara Plantation.Take 25 Special Reserve Cacao Bars to Guy Etame in Douala at Capital Sweets to receive $40,000 and to receive access to purchase Doualan Cacao.

• Coffee Beans/Coffee Beans Part 2/Back to Felix: Request by Felix Baumeister in Cape Town at Cape Town Manufacturing LTD. See Hekili Pilipo in Kona at the Open Air Market and purchase Kona Coffee Beans, cream and sugar. Return to Felix Baumeister in Cape Town at Cape Town Manufacturing and make coffee.

• Making Cup A Joe: Request by Felix Baumeister in Cape Town at Cape Town Manufacturing LTD. Take 20 Cup a Joe to Florian Amiel in Zurich at the University of Zurich and receive the recipe for Mocha.

• Ticket to Morocco: Request by Agostina Calvino (travels). Have 10 Chocolate Hazelnut Bars in inventory for Agostina Calvino to receive $5,000 and access to Tangiers.

• Alex in Australia: Request by Rick Lafontaine (travels). Talk with Alex Fletcher in Uluru and receive another space in the Recipe Book for "Your Creations".

• Orange Bars for Morocco: Request by Agostina Calvino (travels). Take 12 Orange Bars to Jilali Abillou in Tangiers at the Hotel Tangiers and receive $15,000.

• Heikili's Coffee (optional): Request by Heikili Pilipo in Kona at the Open Air Market. Take 75 Cup A Joes and 75 Mocha to Hekili Pilipo in Kona at the Open Air Market and receive $25,000.

• The Endorsement of Felix: Request by Felix Baumeister in Cape Town at Cape Town Manufacturing. Make 5 different coffees, take ownership of 1 shop and return to Felix Baumeister in Cape Town at Cape Town Manufacturing and receive an endorsement from Felix to become CEO.

• An Order for Mocha (optional): Request by Felix Baumeister in Cape Town at Cape Town Manufacturing. Take 75 Mocha to Florian Amiel in Zurich at the University of Zurich and receive $50,000.

• Pre-Order for Arabian Bold: Request by Zachariah Tangye in Toronto at Waterfront Sweets. Take 40 Arabian Bold to Zachariah Tangy in Tangiers at Moroccan Fine Coffee and receive the recipe for Coffee w/Mint and $10,000.

• Working with Zachariah: Request by Zachariah Tangye in Toronto at Waterfront Sweets. Take 100 Special Reserve Cacao Bars to Zachariah Tangye in Tangiers at Moroccan Fine Coffee shop to receive the Partnering with Zachariah Quest.

• Café con Leche for Shobha/Havana de Cuba!: Requests by Cheena Famosa in Havana at Havana Coffee Beans and Shobha Mudaliar (travels) Buy Cuban Coffee Beans from Cheena Famosa in Havana at Havana Coffee Beans LTD to receive Café con Leche recipe. Have 24 Café con Leche in inventory for Shobha Mudaliar and receive passage to Cuba.

• Opening the Machines (can delay quest indefinitely): Request by Condela Llynas in Havana at Casino National. Take 35 of your creations to Condela Llinas in Havana at the Casino National to receive access to the Casino National and play mini-games.

• Trade for a Coffee Recipe: Request by Felix Baumeister in Cape Town at Cape Town Manufacturing LTD. Take 34 Special Reserve Cacao Bars to Ilan Layani in Tangiers at Gibraltar Port to receive the recipe for Special Blend.

• Partnering with Zachariah: Request by Zachariah Tangye in Toronto at Waterfront Sweets. Take 100 Mochas and 100 of you second creations (or another coffee) to Zachariah Tangye in Tangiers at Moroccan Fine Coffee to receive ownership of Moroccan Fine Coffee.

• A Message from Alex: Request by Rick Lafontaine (travels). See Alex Fletcher at the Hotel de Cuba to receive access to Bali.

• The New Ingredient: Request by Ilan Layani in Tangiers at Gibraltar Port. Take 2 cases of Chocolate Raspberry Bars to Ilan Layani in Tangiers at Gibraltar Port to receive access to raspberries.

• Coffee for Hotel Tangiers (optional): Request by Jilai Abilou in Tangiers at Hotel Tangiers. Take 65 Cup A Joes, 65 Mocha, 65 Arabian Bold to Jilali Abilou in Tangiers at Hotel Tangiers and receive $80,000.

• Using Whipped Cream: Request by Agostina Calvino (travels). Take 28 Coffee w/Whipped Cream to Nino Bragger in Zurich at the Swiss National Bank and receive access to Nutmeg and $45,000.

• Meeting Deiter: Request by Felix Baumeister in Cape Town at Cape Town Manufacturing LTD. Talk to Deiter Baumeister in Tokyo at Honmei Industries and receive the recipe for Pecan Infusions.

• Kintamani Plantation: Request by Santo Devi Bali at Kintamani Plantation.Take 10 cases each of 2 of "Your Creations" to Santoso Devi in Bali at Kintamani Plantation and receive recipes for Breakfast Blend and Coffee w/Amaretto. You will also receive access to Balinese Cacao and Balinese Coffee Beans.

• A New Spice: Request by Ilan Layani in Tangiers at Gibraltar Port. Take 60 Chocolate Caramel Bars to Magdalene Gelder in Tangiers at Souk Market and receive 20 Cinnamon and Recipe for Coffee w/Cinnamon.

• Back to Kailua Fine Goods/Hawaiian Outlet: Requests by Zachariah Tangye in Tangiers at Moroccan Fine Coffees and Leialoha Naea in on Kona at Kailua Fine Goods. Take 120 of "Your Creations" to Zachariah Tangye in Tangiers at Moroccan Fine Coffee, then take a trip to Leialoha Naea in Kona at Kailua Fine Goods and receive a quest.

• Deiter's Endorsement: Request by Deiter Baumeister in Tokyo at Honmei Industries. Learn 9 Infusion recipes and own a second shop, the talk to Deiter Baumeister in Tokyo at Honmei Industries and receive endorsement from Deiter to become CEO.

• Very Curious: Request by Deiter Baumeister in Tokyo at Honmei Industries. Take 32 Pecan Infusions to Bianca Rabiti in Tangiers at the Lookout and receive $20,000.

• Infusions Exchange: Request by Yoshi Kawai in Tokyo at Nakamitsu Fine Coffees and Sweets. Take 50 Milk Chocolate Infusions to Daisuke Sato in Tokyo at Tokyo Station and receive recipe for Vanilla Cinnamon Infusions and access to Vanilla.

• Spicy Dark Chocolate Infusions: Request by Surea Siqueira (travels). Have 75 Spicy Dark Infusions in inventory for Surea Siqueira and receive 100 Cayenne Peppers, 100 Anise.

• Cacao in Tokyo? (Optional, can be rejected but not postponed): Request by Diasuke Sato in Tokyo at Tokyo Station. Take 31 Vanilla Cinnamon Infusions to Reiko Tsuneda in Tokyo at Nakamise Market and receive 10,000 Cacao.

• An Order for Coffee w/Amaretto (optional): Request by Felix Baumeister in Cape Town at Cape Town Manufacturing LTD. Take 80 Coffee w/Amaretto Rufus Loddington in Cape Town within 5 months to receive 160 Amaretto and $50,000.

• A Glut of Cuban Coffee (optional): Request by Cheena Famosa in Havana at Havana Coffee Beans LTD. Take 75 Special Blend to Cheena Famosa in Havana at Havana Coffee Beans LTD to receive 5,000 Cuban Coffee Beans.

• A Favor for Leialoha/Back to Kailua Fine Goods Again: Requests by Leialoha Naea in Kona at Kailua Fine Goods and Kalei Kamlaninui in Kona at Ka'awa Loa Plantation. Take 60 Cup A Joe & 60 Mocha to Kalei Kamlaninui in Kona at Ka'awa Loa Plantation in Kona, then see Leialoha Naea in Kona at Kailua Fine Goods.

• Owning Kailua Fine Goods: Request by Leialoha Naea in Kona at Kailua Fine Goods. Take 50 Honey Bars, 50 Arabian Bold, and 50 of "Your Creations" to Leialoha Naea in Kona at Kailua Fine Goods to receive ownership of Kailua Fine Goods.

• Honey Exchange: Request by Bianca Rabiti in Tangiers at the Lookout. Give 25 Honey Bars to Bianca Rabiti in Tangiers at the Lookout and receive 100 Honey.

• Gambling, Anyone: Request by Yuriko Haneda (travels). Have 100 strawberries in inventory for Yuriko Haneda to receive access to Las Vegas and the recipe for Strawberry Anise Infusions.

• Off to Bogota: Request by Kenje Watanabe in Tokyo at Imperial Palace. Talk with Susana Vanegas in Bogota at La Catederal to have access to Bogota.

• Dark Colombian Cacao Lime Infusions: Request by Susana Vanegas in Bogotá at La Catederal. Take 25 of "Your Creations" to Susana Vanegas in Bogota at La Catederal and receive recipe for Colombian Lime Infusions.

• A Second Recipe from Susana: Request by Susana Vanegas in Bogotá at La Catederal. Take 45 Colombian Lime Infusions to Susana Vanegas in Bogota at La Catederal and receive the recipe for Specialty Macadamia Infusions.

• Sweet and Spicy: Request by Ilan Layani in Tangiers at Gibraltar Port. Take 40 Mango Clove Infusions to Ilan Layani in Tangiers at Gibraltar Port and receive recipes for Mango Clove Infusions and Blended Cacao Infusions.

• A Couple Cuban Coffee Recipes: Request by Lolita de Guines in Havana at Hotel de Cuba. Take 15 Coffee w/Nutmeg and 15 Coffee w/Whipped Cream to Lolita de Guines in Havana at Hotel de Cuba and receive recipes for Coffee w/Nutmeg and Irish Coffee.

• Fruity Infusions: Request by Deiter Baumeister in Tokyo at Honmei Industries. Give 45 Cherry Infusions and 45 Chocolate Raspberry Bars to Asako Yamura in Tokyo at Tokyo Tower.

• Making Evangeline's Acquaintance: Request by Deiter Baumeister in Tokyo at Honmei Industries. Talk to Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at San Francisco Chocolate Makers and receive Evangeline's endorsement and Truffles fro the Board Quests.

• An Order for Fruity Infusions: Request by Asako Yamura in Tokyo at Tokyo Tower. Take 45 Cherry Infusions and 45 Blueberry Infusions to Asako Yamura in Tokyo at Tokyo Tower and receive $100,000.

• Strange Place for Cacao (optional): Request by Pamela Harrington (travels). Take 100 Irish Coffees to Kowaki in Uluru and receive 7,500 Cacao.

• Earning Evangeline's Endorsement: Request by Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at Baumeister Confections. Make 12 Truffle recipes and take ownership of the third shop, then return to Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at Baumeister Confections and receive Endorsement from Evangeline to become CEO.

• Truffles Introduction: Request by Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at Baumeister Confections. Give 1 White Truffle to Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at Baumeister Confections and receive recipes for Spicy Currant Truffles, Lemon Raspberry Truffles, Wasabi Cashew Truffles, Hazelnut Milk Truffles, and Honey Milk Truffles along with access to Toronto and Wellington.

• Truffles for the Board: Request by Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at Baumeister Confections. Take a case of truffles to each of the Board Members and collect 11 Truffle recipes, then return to Evangeline.

***MAJOR SPOILER**
BOARD MEMBERS, TRUFFLES TO GIVE AND TRUFFLE RECIPES RECEIVED:

1. Give Joseph Tangye in Toronto at Waterfront Sweets the Hazelnut Milk Chocolate Truffles and receive the recipe for Blended Varietal Cacao Pumpkin Truffles.
2. Give Felix Baumeister in Cape Town at Cape Town Manufacturing, LTD the Honey Milk Chocolate Truffles and receive the recipe for Specialty Cacao Espresso Truffles.
3. Give Dieter Baumeister in Tokyo at Honmei Industries the Wasabi Cashew Truffles and you will receive the recipe for Sesame Ginger Colombian Cacao Truffles.
4. Give Whitney Baumeister in Wellington at New Zealand Confectioners, LTD the Lemon Raspberry Truffles and receive the recipe fro Cameroonian Dark Truffles with Saffron.
5. Give Alex Fletcher in San Francisco the Spicy Currant Truffles and receive the recipe for Peruvian Cacao Cardamom and Nutmeg Truffles.

• Milk Chocolate Infusions w/Blueberry: Request by Rahim Talib (travels). Have 26 Blueberry Infusions in inventory for Rahim Talib in 8 weeks and receive the recipe for Dark Ginger Infusions.

• Cuban Retail: Request by Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at Baumeister Confections. Take 100 Cameroonian Truffles w/Saffron, 100 Blended Pumpkin Truffles, 100 Peruvian Cardamom Nutmeg Truffles, and 100 of "Your Creations" to Armena Carababalla in Havana at Vedado Chocolates and Coffees to receive ownership of Vedado Chocolates and Coffee along with $100,000.

• Large Coffee Order (optional, can be rejected but not postponed): Request by Kefilwe Matibula in Cape Town at Adderly Street Chocolate Shop. Take 70 Irish Coffee, 70 Café con Leche and 70 Special Blend to Duduzile Nkosi in Cape Town at Table Mountain and receive $100,000.

• An Invitation from Joseph Tangye: Request by Joseph Tangye in Toronto at Waterfront Sweets. Talk to Joseph Tangye in Toronto at Waterfront Sweets and receive the Endorsement Quests from Whitney Baumeister and Joseph Tangye.

• The Endorsements of Joseph: Request by Joseph Tangye in Toronto at Waterfront Sweets. Have/make 11 Coffee Blend recipes and $3,000,000 then return to Joseph Tangye in Toronto at Waterfront Sweets and receive the CEO endorsement from Joseph Tangye along with the recipe for Mexican Coffee.

• From Joseph to Whitney: Request by Joseph Tangye in Toronto at Waterfront Sweets. Take 1 Super Buzz Coffee to Whitney Baumeister in Wellington at New Zealand Confectioners, LTD to gain access to the Wellington Factory and Exotic Confections.

• Endorsement by Whitney: Request by Whitney Baumeister in Wellington at New Zealand Confectioners, LTD. Have/make 11 Exotic Recipes and 7 of "Your Creations" then take then to Whitney Baumeister in Wellington at New Zealand Confectioners, LTD and receive the endorsement from Whitney Baumeister to become CEO.

• From Whitney to Joseph: Request by Whitney Baumeister in Wellington at New Zealand Confectioners, LTD. Take 1 Salted Dark Caramels to Joseph Tangye in Toronto at Waterfront Sweets and receive the recipe for Salted Caramels.

• A Special Order: Request by Motochika Haneda (travels). Have 35 each of 2 of "Your Creations" in inventory for Motochika Haneda to receive recipes for Candied Rose Petals and Coconut Milk Coffee Blend.

• A Lead on Exotics: Request by Joseph Tangye in Toronto at Waterfront Sweets. Take 60 Wasabi Cashew Truffles to Keylla Astengo in Lima at Plaza Mayor and receive the recipes for Lemon Lime Stars and Dark Dates w/Almonds..

• A Pair of Exotics Recipes: Request by Keylla Astengo in Lima at Plaza Mayor. Take 50 Lemon Lime Stars to Keylla Astengo in Lima at Plaza Mayor and receive recipes for Lemon Lime Stars and Dark Dates w/Almonds.

• A Recipe for Sale: Request by Claudia Elquez in Las Vegas at Stan's Market. Take 78 Mint and Whiskey Liqueurs to Henri Makongue in Douala at Capital Sweets and $25,000 to Claudia Elquez in Las Vegas at Stan's Market and receive the recipes for Mint and Whiskey Liqueurs, Salted Pistachios and Peanut Butter Stars.

• Coffee Among Brothers: Request by Joseph Tangye in Toronto at Waterfront Sweets. Take 20 Super Mocha Blend, 20 Hazelnut Infused Coffee Blend and 20 Super Buzz to Felix Baumeister in Cape Town at Cape Town Manufacturing, LTD and receive recipes for Super Mocha Blend, Spicy Blend, Winter Warmer and Hazelnut Infused Coffee.

• Sandy Adventure: Request by Mariana Nana (travels). Take 50 Dark Chocolate Dates with Almonds to Mariana Nama in Lima and receive access to the Gobi Desert and the recipe for Sweet Chai Stars.

• Business in Iraq: Request by Motochika Haneda (travels). Take 50 Coffee w/Amaretto and 50 Pumpkin Latte to Abrahem Sa'eed in Baghdad at Tigris River Coffees and receive recipe for Caramel Latte and Pumpkin Latte.

• An Iraqi Shop: Request by Abrahem Sa'eed in Baghdad at Tigris River Coffees. Take 200 Caramel Latte to Zenab Sinjari in Baghdad at Abbasids Mosque and receive the recipes for Coffee Grog and the quest for the Iraqi Shop

• An Offer for Capital Sweets: Request by Henri Makongue in Douala at Capital Sweets. Take 100 of "Your Creations", 100 Peanut Butter Stars and 100 Irish Coffee to Henri Makongue in Douala at Capital Sweets and receive ownership of Capital Sweets.

• Your Lucky Day (when asked do you feel lucky select yes): Request by Agostina Calvino (travels). Receive recipe for Café Caribe.

• Your Iraqi Shop: Request by Zenab Sinjari in Baghdad at Tigris River Coffees. Request by Take 200 Coffee Grog and 50 each of "Your Creations" to Abrahem in Baghdad at Tigris River Coffees and receive ownership of shop.

• Columbian Treats: Request by Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at Baumeister Confections. Take 65 Sesame Ginger Colombian Truffles and 25 Mediterranean Coffees to Pedro Barreda in Bogota at the Andes Mountains and receive recipe for Orange Pecan Stars and access to Sesame Seeds.

• More Recipes in Colombia: Request by Pedro Barreda in Bogotá at the Andes Mountains. Take 12 Orange Pecan Stars and 12 Strawberry Anise Infusions to Susan Vanegas in Bogotá at La Catederal and receive recipes for World's Finest Chocolate Strawberries and Dark Honey Butter Crunch.

• The Double Cross: Request by Alex Fletcher (travels). Take 25 of each Blended Deep Chocolate w/Cashews, Café Caribe, Specialty Espresso Truffles, Blended Dark Infusions, Breakfast Blend and Special Reserve Bars to receive access to Xunantunich.

• Sean's Rescue: Request by Cambria Equivel in Xunantunich at Cambria's Place. Take $1,000,000 to Cambria Equivel in Xunantunich at Cambria's Place and receive the quest in 3 months that Sean is alive.

• Sean is Alive: Request by Agostina Calvino (travels). Talk to Cambria Equivel in Xunantunich at Cambria's Place and rescue Sean Fletcher.

• Highest Honors Part 1: Request by Alex Fletcher (travels). Create a new recipe and take the first 6 of "Your Creations" to Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at Baumeister Confections and receive the last quest.

• Highest Honors Part 2: Request by Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at Baumeister Confections. Take 200 each of the last 6 of "Your Creations" to Evangeline Baumeister in San Francisco at Baumeister Confections. WAIT 1 MONTH. you'll be awarded Master Chocolatier and $10,000,00. completed. play more if you want.

Content(s) of this game guide may not be copied or published on any other site without permission from Casual Game Guides. ©CasualGameGuides.com 2006 - 2021


10 Gourmet Mac and Cheese Recipes with Delicious Additions

If your mac and cheese knowledge is limited to pre-portioned pasta and powdered cheese… we’re here to help. It’s pretty hard to go wrong with warm carbs and cheese, but truly, the variations are endless. Here we have 10 different and (dare we say it?) fancy mac and cheese recipes to guide you into your adventures beyond the box.
By Danielle Isbell

This article has been posted with permission and originally appeared as 11 Crazy Good Ways to Dress Up Mac and Cheese on Relish

www.blog.lacrema.com

Dungeness Crab Mac and Cheese

This recipe is a no-brainer for seafood lovers. Featuring Dungeness crab in a homemade cheddar and gruyere béchamel sauce, this pasta is mouth watering delight perfect for anyone with penchant for crab (and a disdain for dieting). Find the recipe here.

www.foolproofliving.com

Oxtail Macaroni Gratin

This French take on macaroni and cheese is the royal highness of this list. It doesn’t get much fancier than a decadent baked pasta featuring oxtail and béchamel sauce. We’re going to call this version luxurious and exotic. Find the recipe here.

www.nelliebellie.com

Macaroni and Cheese Pie

Pizza plus mac ‘n’ cheese? We’re excited too. This hearty and decadent recipe features a deep dish pizza crust filled with macaroni and cheese, then topped with crushed butter crackers. Find the recipe here.

www.thecozyapron.com

“Grown-Up’s” Mac ‘n’ Cheese

Featuring sun-dried tomatoes, prosciutto and three kinds of cheese, there’s nothing childlike about this macaroni and cheese (except maybe the pure delight that occurs during consumption). Try this dish out for hosting a more mature audience, and we promise you’ll never go back to the blue box. Find the recipe here.

www.asweetpeachef.com

Baked Mac ‘n’ Cheese

Classic baked mac ‘n’ cheese is nothing new, we know, but it deserves a nod. This one features all the necessary ingredients for decadence—heavy cream, milk, and two kinds of cheeses. This recipe calls for penne noodles instead of macaroni noodles because ribbed penne gives the creamy cheese sauce a little somethin’ extra to grab on to. Find the recipe here.

www.oliviascuisine.com

Fried Mac and Cheese Balls

Crunchy on the outside, creamy on in the inside—these fried treats are just the ticket for an abundance of leftover mac ‘n’ cheese. They’re addictive in all the best ways, and in this post, Olivia provides detailed step-by-step instructions to nail your frying technique first try. Find the recipe here.

www.creolecontessa.com

Breaking Bread at Balade

Shrimp Mac and Cheese

This Creole sensation adds far more than just seafood to classic mac ‘n’ cheese. Complete with southern seasonings, sautéed shrimp, cream sauce, and bread crumbs, this unforgettable concoction is sure to make your mouth water. It’s definitely a special occasion rendition. Find the recipe here.

wwwbuttercupandbourbon.com

Butternut Squash Mac and Cheese

If you’re overwhelmed by the amount of fat and carbs in all of your favorite mac ‘n’ cheese dishes, this butternut squash recipe is the perfect break from overindulgence. The taste and velvety texture of the squash maintains its status as comfort food, but minimizes the amount of cheesy calories in this meal. Try this one for a healthy, but still delicious, alternative to traditional mac and cheese. Find the recipe here.

www.iamchefblog.com

Pulled Pork Mac and Cheese Sliders

Ready to dive back into overindulgence? This smoky pulled pork burger features mac ‘n’ cheese made with cheddar and brie. You won’t want to miss out on this unforgettable sandwich combo. Find the recipe here.

www.thebeeroness.com

Gouda Cheddar Beer Mac

This recipe comes complete with a detailed step-by-step, and it’s full of tips to achieve the most incredible beer mac ‘n’ cheese out there. Come on—it’s cheese and beer. What’s not to like, right? Find the recipe here.


A menu of gravlax, roasted peppers with lemon ricotta, osso buco and poached pears fit for an evening that unfolds at leisurely pace and ends late.

I’ve lived in Paris part time for 20 years, but it took a while before I realized that I’d never heard a French friend say “dinner party.” When an invitation is offered, it goes something like: “Venez dîner à la maison.” And when my friends repeat it in English, they say, “Come home for dinner.” The warmth in these words struck me when I first heard them and set me at ease, dispelling whatever ideas I had about French dinners being stuffy — and I had been sure they would be. The phrase called to mind — of course, even the mundane can sound dramatic in French — lots of laughter, good wine, an evening that unfolds at a leisurely pace and ends late. It was what I wanted my own Parisian dinners at home to be.

Home has always been Saint-Germain-des-Prés, but I’m in a new apartment. We moved earlier this year, and while I’m still feeling my way around it, I already know it’s a wonderful place for entertaining friends. The living and dining areas are one slant-ceilinged space with three small balconies, each with geraniums, that double as wine coolers when the weather is right. In real estate speak, the kitchen is “charming” in practical terms it’s small and demands neatness. It’s a narrow galley that ends in double doors to another balcony, this one with herbs I can snip.

Over the years, I’ve taken to making dinners on Mondays, the night most French hosts prefer to avoid, because all the outdoor markets and most of the best small food shops are closed that day — it’s impossible to get a morsel of fine cheese on Mondays. But because many restaurants are also closed, it’s a good night to feed the people who often cook for me, my friends who work in food.

I create a menu that can be prepared entirely ahead of time — usually the main course will need to be reheated, and everything will need to be plated, but nothing will keep me in the kitchen long. And while I don’t love the constraint, I love the three or four hours I spend the day before gathering provisions at my neighborhood markets. I know I could buy everything at a supermarket, but there would be no pleasure in it, no chance to chat with Twiggy, the cheesemonger, and catch up on the neighborhood news, and no opportunity to discuss with Serge, the butcher, how I was going to cook my osso buco. Each ingredient has its own story by the time I get it home.

A month or so ago, I made a Monday-night dinner for food-world friends, delighting in discovering that, while they knew of one another, not all of them had met. In addition to my husband, Michael, and me, there were two restaurateurs, Bertrand Auboyneau and Juan Sanchez one cooking-school owner, Jane Bertch and one baker, Apollonia Poilâne, who brought loaves of dark bread.

People in the food business are easy to feed: They’re grateful to have someone else in the kitchen and forgiving if things aren’t just so. But even if they’re quick to ignore whatever faux pas I, an American, might make, it’s because I’m an American in their country that I want to get it right. With the exception of the cheese plate, which slips in between the main course and dessert in France (and for which I early on bought a book to teach myself how to cut cheeses into their proper shapes), dinner runs pretty much the same way in both countries. Yet it can be like those cognates you learn in a foreign language — the words sound similar to those we know, but they turn out to have different meanings.

There was the time I served fried chicken and couldn’t get anyone to pick it up with their hands — for the most part, the French are not finger-lickers. The time all the cheese I served with drinks was left uneaten — cheese is for the cheese course, not for a nibble. The time I put everything out on the table at once, calling it an indoor picnic, and my guests, although urged to mix and match, reorganized my mishmash into a well-ordered traditional French meal and ate one dish at a time, leaving the salad for last, as is done.

Although I now know what’s accepted and acceptable, I occasionally veer off course and always stray at the beginning of the evening. On this Monday, friends began arriving at about 8, late-ish by American standards and just a bit on the early side by French ones. Dinner always starts in the living room and usually at least a quarter-hour after the time you’ve asked people to come (it’s considered impolite to arrive on time, as it’s assumed that the host always needs a few more minutes). I had everything for l’heure de l’apéro, or cocktail hour, set out on the small table in front of the sofa, and I opened the first bottle of white wine as people got settled. Bertrand took off his jacket — dinner at our home is never dressy — Jane found an armchair and was talking bread with Michael, a home baker, and Juan began pouring. Apollonia arrived a little later, and I put her rye bread next to the gravlax and dill yogurt I had made a few days before. The evening had begun and, within minutes, I heard my favorite sound: the chime of glasses touching in a toast.

Custom would have had me serving the wine with insubstantial tidbits — usually nuts, olives, salty crackers and, inexplicably, cherry tomatoes in any season. But because dinner starts late, and this introductory moment lasts one hour — you can set your clock by it — I’d made the gravlax, passing the first round and then encouraging everyone to help themselves.

We eventually drifted to the table, set with wine- and water glasses, carafes, colorful pottery plates Michael and I carried back from a vacation in the South of France and odd dishes and silver we found at flea markets. I had flowers and candles, but no tablecloth or bread plates — I love the way the French put their bread directly on the table, the inevitable crumbs forming hieroglyphs of collective celebration.

The appearance of the roasted peppers, brushed with oil and sherry vinegar and sitting on ricotta mixed with lemon and herbs, sparked a conversation about gardens. Bertrand had planted a vegetable garden, a potager, in Normandy to supply his Paris restaurants, and Juan had plans to plant one in Champagne. Once the dish was finished, Bertrand briefly turned on his phone (sheepishly asking permission first), and pictures of tomatoes and peppers and chard, leeks, potatoes, eggplants and small zucchini with beautiful oversize yellow blossoms were passed around.

Then came the osso buco, which I arranged in shallow bowls in the kitchen, placing each round of meat over a squash purée and putting only the gremolata on the table (to ensure that I wouldn’t have a repeat of the picnic experience). For a few moments there was silence punctuated by mmmms, the best compliment in any language. Then there were questions about how long I cooked the meat (about 90 minutes), comments about the addition of orange in the sauce (noticeable, but not overly so) and praise for the unusual addition of olives (and the fact that they were oil-cured). The cheese plate, always appreciated but not usually talked about (praise is reserved only for things homemade), followed and was talked about, as the Lou Poutou, a soft cow’s-milk cheese from southwestern France, was new to Jane and Bertrand. As I was clearing the dishes, Michael noticed that it was 11 o’clock, and so we refilled our wineglasses and went onto the balcony to see the Eiffel Tower sparkle — an interlude that might just become a ritual.

Table Talk

Asking questions can get a guest to reveal something fascinating about herself. But a quick way to prevent that is to give her possible answers. “Why did you quit law school — was it too boring?” Leave out the guess. A short question is more likely to provoke details.

These dinners at home are not really about the food. They’re about friendship and the conversation that goes on around the table, often late into the night. Yet so much of the talk is about food — the food we’re sharing, the meals we remember, the ones we’ll soon eat, the food we’ve cooked and what we want to cook. New restaurants. New chefs. Has anyone tried the Italian stall at the market? Is bread getting better or worse in the city? Of course, there’s also talk of politics: Will Paris’s mayor really ban cars? What will Macron do? And Trump? “Oh, let’s talk about dessert,” someone says, and we do.

I had made wine-poached pears spiced with cinnamon, cloves and star anise and a cookie with Italian roots, called a torta sbrisolona. The cookie, an eight-inch square, is a communal offering — each person reaches in and breaks off a piece. It was past midnight when I noticed that the candles had burned to stubs. I didn’t turn up the lights — the coziness was too nice. We all had our elbows on the table amid the scattering of crumbs. We bent in, listening closely, and poured one another more wine.

Dorie Greenspan is the On Dessert columnist for the magazine and the author of a dozen cookbooks her next book, “Everyday Dorie,” will be published in 2018.

Photographs by John Kernick for The New York Times. Food stylist: Maggie Ruggiero. Prop stylist: Sophie Glasser.

Table Talk: Rico Gagliano and Brendan Francis Newnam are the authors of the forthcoming book “Brunch Is Hell” from Little, Brown. They host “The Dinner Party Download” podcast and radio program.


Pure Decadence at Vaux le Vicomte

It’s been called the loveliest château in France, a perfectly proportioned masterpiece of French 17th-century architecture, decorative arts and garden design. Created by a remarkable man who surrounded himself with the greatest artists of his era, Vaux le Vicomte remains magically alive today thanks to its entrepreneurial current owner Count Patrice de Vogüé who, with his wife Cristina, has devoted his life to its restoration, maintenance and presentation to the public.

A gorgeous book by the countess invites readers inside Vaux for a very personal glimpse of the sweeter side of life in the castle. In Decadent Desserts: Recipes from Château Vaux-le-Vicomte, Cristina de Vogüé shares her favorite recipes and those of her family and friends in a stunningly designed large-format book that showcases luscious cakes, tarts and other sweets displayed not only on the château’s lustrous porcelain, antique silver and hand-woven linens but also in unexpected settings—atop a marble mantelpiece, a pile of leather-bound books or the brocade upholstery of a canapé. Not just a feast for dessert-lovers, the book offers a leisurely stroll through the château and its splendid gardens, with lingering looks at its elegant details—a music-themed wall panel from the Salle des Buffets, a glimpse of a vibrant painted ceiling through a crystal chandelier, the infinite perspective view reflected in the gilded mirrors of the dining room.

The château’s dramatic history may already be familiar to France Today readers (The Dream of Vaux, June 2008) but it’s worth retelling. Vaux was built by Nicolas Fouquet, an ambitious bureaucrat from Anjou who married money, entered Parliament at age 20 and rose rapidly under the tutelage of Cardinal Mazarin to become the young Louis XIV’s minister of finance. Celebrating his success by building a château like no other, Fouquet brought together three brilliant artists—architect Louis Le Vau, artist-decorator Charles Le Brun and landscape designer André Le Nôtre—who worked for five years directing thousands of workers to construct the castle and gardens. With an unerring eye for talent, Fouquet chose François Vatel to oversee his kitchens, and entertained La Fontaine and Molière.

When all was completed in August 1661, he invited the young king and his court to his chef-d’oeuvre for a dazzling—but ultimately disastrous—fête. Entertainment in the gardens included concerts, fountains, water jousts on the Grand Canal and a comédie-ballet by Molière and his troupe. Vatel surpassed himself on the banquet, which was served to the king’s table on solid gold plate as candlelight flickered on gilt stucco moldings, gold-threaded tapestries and jewel-toned paintings. And as guests were climbing into their carriages to return to the nearby royal residence at Fontainebleau, a spectacular fireworks display exploded in the night sky.

But the king was not amused. Louis was furious at being upstaged by one of his subjects and Jean-Baptiste Colbert, who had replaced Mazarin, convinced the jealous monarch that Fouquet was not only dipping into the till, but also plotting against the throne. Several weeks later Fouquet was arrested—and he never saw Vaux again. Charged with treason and embezzlement, he was subjected to a three-year trial and imprisoned until his death in 1680. His tapestries, furniture and other valuables were confiscated by the king, and the talent that produced Vaux was put to work creating Versailles.

The château passed through the hands of several aristocratic families before being abandoned in the mid 19th-century. It was in a sorry state when it was bought at auction in 1875 by Alfred Sommier, Patrice de Vogüé’s great-grandfather, head of one of France’s largest sugar refineries. Sommier, and later his son Edme, spent decades—and millions—restoring the château, and Patrice continued the work when he inherited the castle in 1967, the same year he married an Italian diplomat’s daughter, Cristina Colonna di Paliano.

The young couple moved into the castle and a year later, after visiting several of England’s stately homes to see how they operated, opened Vaux to the public. Realizing that the lack of restaurants near the castle was a problem, they decided to open a simple bistrot in one of the outbuildings, and responsibility for feeding the public fell to Cristina. Her half-French, half-Russian mother had never cooked, she recounts, and she herself had been raised “with a cordon-bleu nanny and personal chefs … I grew up incapable of so much as boiling an egg.”

Undaunted, she studied cookbooks, copied recipes from her husband’s family and did all the cooking herself for the first few years. One memorable day, when five unexpected busloads of tourists arrived and she had 250 visitors to feed, she found enough main dishes in the freezer but no dessert. Improvising with stewed apples and whatever else was on hand, she created an apple tart with an unexpected topping—cornflakes—that remains a family favorite and is included in the book.

When the visitor count reached 100,000, the bistrot was abandoned in favor of a larger self-service restaurant run by professionals, and although the de Vogüés, who have three sons, have long had a family chef, Cristina still cooks for family and friends. And those early baptism-by-fire days in the restaurant kitchen planted some of the seeds for her book.

“The real story starts 25 years ago'” she recalls, serving coffee in the sunny living room of the family’s private quarters, a collection of outbuildings surrounding a glorious courtyard garden next to the château. “I thought of doing a cookbook and I started to write out a few recipes. I had some pink paper at the time and I sent four pink pages of recipes to an editor I knew, asking him what he thought. He wrote me back a letter that said ‘Go on’. That was all I needed—it gave me confidence and amour-propre and I was satisfied. I didn’t need to do any more. I put all the pages in a drawer.” There they stayed until last year, when she took them out again. Within three months she had compiled a complete collection of dessert recipes. Why just desserts? “I like sweets and I’m good at sweets,” she says, passing a plate of featherlight hazelnut macarons to go with the espresso.

Meanwhile, her husband was working on his own book project, a history of the château from the time his great-grandfather bought it to the present day. Published in June by Actes Sud, it’s a fascinating behind-the-scenes account of the restoration of Vaux le Vicomte, and the extraordinary devotion and effort it takes to keep a private château open to the public in France today.

When she learned that an editor from the Flammarion publishing house had turned down her husband’s manuscript because the photographs were in black and white, she saw an opportunity. “I went to my office, called her and asked—would you be interested in my cookbook? She said yes immediately.” A photographer and stylist were chosen, and after repeated visits and photo sessions, the book was published in three editions—French, English and German. (The de Vogüés now enjoy a friendly rivalry in book sales.)

The recipes, culled from the family’s personal favorites and friend’s contributions—her nanny’s apple tart, Lady Cawdor’s orange soufflé, a walnut tart burnished with dark caramel—are rich and original, yet simple enough for the home chef. Much of the art lies in the decoration: one cake is studded with red currants, raspberries and brilliant green leaves a multilayered confection is crowned on one level with blueberries, on another with macarons, and on a third with a ruched satin ribbon a silky chocolate mousse is wreathed in flowers.

Decadent Desserts also includes family photographs and charming anecdotes of life in the castle. “Vaux le Vicomte was purchased, restored and maintained using sugar industry revenue,” says the author, “and, fittingly, it once more bathes in the aromas of cakes fresh from the oven. Vaux seems fated to lead a sweet life.”

Get the recipe for the Countess’s chocolate cake here.

Decadent Desserts: Recipes from Château Vaux-le-Vicomte by Countess Cristina de Vogüé, Flammarion, 2008.

Mémoire d’un Chef-d’Oeuvre: Vaux le Vicomte, by Patrice de Vogüé, Imprimerie Nationale Actes Sud, 2008. Currently available only in French.

Originally published in the October 2008 issue of France Today updated in November 2011


Our 10 Best NYC Restaurants of the Last Two Centuries

The modern restaurant as we know it was invented in 1831 south of Wall Street at Delmonico’s, based on Swiss and French models. The previous sort of establishment was usually a hotel dining room with limited dinner choices a coffeehouse that offered tea sandwiches, pastries, and sometimes a set meal or two and eating houses that made the food-fight scene in Animal House look tame.

These types of venues held down the lower end of the dining spectrum (the wealthy had their own cooks, the poor ate at home or in the streets), and a meal at any of these places was likely to occur in a hubbub. Further discomfited by sometimes having to stand, eaters were expected to finish their meals in 20 minutes or less, just like at franchise fast-food restaurants today. There was nothing relaxing about eating in a New York restaurant before the advent of Delmonico’s, and it was enough to give you indigestion.

But suddenly fine dining hit town. A meal occurred at a more leisurely pace the table was set with fine napery and crystal, and the bill of fare offered a bewildering number of choices. At first the menu was mainly French and prix fixe, but gradually it became à la carte, meaning you had lots of choice to make, and it included other cuisines besides French as waves of immigrants influenced American gastronomy. By 1900, you could get German, Irish, Middle Eastern, and even Chinese food, all in a single fine-dining establishment.

Following are the 10 best restaurants the city has seen in the last two centuries. These are the places that, in their own times, exhibited the most buzz and had the best food. We don’t include restaurants that have made their reputations in the last 10 years — such as Eleven Madison Park, Jean Georges, Masa, and Per Se — nor do we include places that fall short of being a true restaurant as defined by the Delmonico brothers (Di Fara, Trattoria D’Alfredo, the Automat, and Sripraphai, that leaves you out!). These restaurants are upscale, too, since few records exist of any but the most expensive places.

The restos are presented chronologically, but in order to not cop out on our promise to say which are the best, a ranked list is provided on the last page. We are indebted to many sources, including dozens of restaurant review books by Malcolm Forbes, Craig Claiborne, Seymour Britchky, Ruth Reichl, Mimi Sheraton, and many others to the New York Times online archive to the New York Public Library Picture Collection to The Encyclopedia of New York City to the WPA Guide to New York to Food and Drink in America by Richard Hooker to countless period cookbooks to On the Town in New York by Michael and Ariane Batterberry and, of course, to Wikipedia.

1. Bank Coffee House, 43 Pine Street (1814-1828) — Though we generally credit Alice Waters with inventing locavorism, Irish immigrant William “Billy” Niblo was way ahead of her, as he offered his guests “bald eagle shot on the Grouse Plains of Long Island” and “hawk and owl shot in Turtle Grove, Hoboken.” According to his obituary in the Times (August 22, 1878), “He had the peculiar habit, when he had procured some rare dish, of making it an occasion for a public reception of his patrons, all of whom he desired should partake of the delicacy.” One evening he treated his guests to an entire roast bear wheeled into the dining room standing up and still smoking. Niblo closed the Bank in 1828, and soon thereafter founded a vast theater complex and dining garden at Prince Street and Broadway called the Sans Souci, where musical theater along modern lines was invented.

2. Delmonico’s, 21-23 William Street (1831-1923, intermittently thereafter) — In 1831 Swiss brothers John and Peter Delmonico founded the city’s first formal restaurant, which evolved out of a pastry shop they started in 1829 on William Street. Two years later, they added six pine tables and began serving hot meals. A lady cashier — very unusual for that age — also attracted customers. The great fire of 1835 caused the first of what was to be several moves, landing the restaurant in 1837 at the corner of William and Beaver, where a later version of the restaurant still stands today. By that time, the menu had come to encompass 346 entrées, printed in French and English, including 29 versions of beef filet with various preparations and sauces. It was just like eating at Shopsin’s! Over the course of a century, many dishes were invented at Delmonico’s, including Lobster Newburg, pie à la mode, baked Alaska, and the Delmonico steak. Suddenly the wealthy and famous were all dining out, a habit they’ve never abandoned to this day.

Dining innovations: French chef S.B. Monnot instituted à la carte dining in 1844 (before that, you paid one price for your entire meal, whatever options you exercised for various courses) at New York Hotel, and provided room service there for the first time, too.

3. Restaurant at the Waldorf Hotel, later the Waldorf-Astoria, Fifth Avenue and 33rd Street (1893-1943) — This eating establishment was famously presided over by former Delmonico’s waiter Oscar Tschirky (later universally known as “Oscar of the Waldorf”), who knew all the celebrities of his age from the fields of finance, government, and the arts. He established the first door policy for his restaurant, quite literally inventing the velvet rope. Though he wasn’t a chef, he is often credited with popularizing eggs Benedict, Waldorf salad, Thousand Island dressing, and veal Oscar — breaded cutlets served with crab, asparagus, and a cheddar-cheese sauce. Tschirky was also big on ostentatious service, with many dishes being finished table-side, using fire whenever possible.

4. Rector’s, Broadway and 44th Street (1899-1914) — In a sense, Rector’s represented a natural extension and democratization of opulent restaurants for the wealthy like Delmonico’s and the Waldorf-Astoria. Located in the new Theater District around Times Square, it catered to actors, musicians, and theatergoers, offering the core of French cuisine that was to be expected, but also turning out effete versions of dishes that represented the incursion of Italian (chicken cacciatore), German (wiener schnitzel), Yankee (oyster stew), Anglo-Indian (lamb curry), Lebanese (pilaf), and even Chinese food (chicken chop suey) into the popular taste. Rector’s was the first restaurant to entertain its patrons with jazz and show tunes. Other places followed, in what was to become a restaurant genre called “lobster palaces,” of which the Oyster Bar at Grand Central is one of the few remaining examples.

5. Barbetta, 321 West 46th Street (1906-present) — Piedmont native Sebastiano Maioglio brought refined northern Italian food to the rear end of the Metropolitan Opera on West 39th Street, where Barbetta catered to Italian-born musicians, later moving to its current location. The restaurant introduced an enormous number of Italian delicacies to the American public for the first time, including white truffles, fresh porcini mushrooms, and espresso from a real espresso machine. Writing in his 1930 Dining in New York, critic Rian James gave Barbetta effusive praise: “[T]he Finocchio, the Veal Cotlette Parmigiana, the Scallopine of Veal al Marsala, and the curly Chicory with Barbetta dressing, are the things that have made the establishment stand out like an oasis in a desert of French Table d’hotes, one-arm cafeterias, and synthetic Italian Gardens” (as quoted recently in Eater National). But by the modern era, the restaurant had slipped from its earlier heights. Despite a newly sumptuous decor, heavy with 18th-century Piedmontese furnishings, the 1990 Zagat guide declared that the restaurant is like “an aristocratic Italian lady suffering from severe arthritis.”

6. 21 Club, 21 West 52nd Street (1930-present) — Like Oscar’s Waldorf, the 21 Club was the restaurant that defined “exclusive” for its age. It started as a speakeasy, and introduced the idea that you were to be judged by the table you were given — the corners were reserved for celebrities. “One of the finest restaurants in the world, operated as though it were a private club,” said restaurant critic Lawton Mackall in his landmark review book, Knife and Fork in New York (1948). The cellar contained a reputed 40,000 bottles, and the signature recipes included steak tartare, chicken hash, all sorts of raw shellfish and caviar, crab cakes, and Caesar salad. Even today, you can see the limos lined up in front of its premises, lavishly decorated with wrought iron and, rather absurdly, the figures of lawn jockeys named for famous patrons.

7. Le Pavillon, 5 East 55th Street (1941-1971) — Under restaurateur Henri Soule, Le Pavillon began life as Le Restaurant du Pavillon de France, the eating establishment of the French pavilion at the 1939 World’s Fair. The food it presented was a revelation to New York diners, who were still eating French food directly descended from Delmonico’s, with heavy cream-based sauces and massive portions. Le Pavillon presented the cuisine for the first time in its evolved form. The restaurant moved to Manhattan in 1941, and in 1964, near the start of his reviewing career, Craig Claiborne of the Times was still able to exclaim, “Le Pavillon is and has been since its opening in 1939 the finest French restaurant in New York and probably in the United States.” Signature dishes included chicken braised in champagne, filet of sole bonne femme, lamb stew with vegetables, and beef bourguignon.

8. Coach House, 110 Waverly Place (1949-1993) — Owned by Greek immigrant Leon Lianides, this intimate Greenwich Village restaurant took its inspiration not from French cuisine but from sturdy American fare, and thus launched a movement that is still being felt today. In doing so, Lianides influenced countless of today’s chefs, beginning with James Beard, who could often be seen at the bar eating a bowl of the restaurant’s famous sherry-laced black bean soup. And chef Anne Rosenzweig noted enthusiastically, “Oh, those corn sticks, you thought about them for weeks before you finally went for dinner. It was a forerunner of the American cooking we do today.”

9. Lutece, 249 East 50th Street (1961-2004) — Under the direction first of founder Andre Surmain, and later André Soltner, Lutece was the natural successor to Le Pavillon as the place that hoisted the banner of modern French cuisine. But what a difference a couple of decades had made! Now the signature dish was foie gras luxuriously soaked in chocolate sauce with a side of bitter marmalade, an unctuous turtle soup, and an Alsatian onion tart that was soon copied in half the city’s restaurants, and remains a dining standard today. In the early ’80s, Mimi Sheraton rhapsodized over the apps: “[The] possibilities are extraordinary, whether you choose the puffy, crisp-crusted Alsatian onion tart, the fine juniper-perfumed duck mousse or foie gras baked in an eggy brioche dough, the feuillete puff pastry, filled with the whipped, creamed salt codfish, brandade, and then finished with a pink beurre blanc.” Obviously, nouvelle cuisine had yet to make its mark.

10. Daniel, 60 East 65th Street (1993 to present) — Of Lyon native Daniel Boulud, the Times‘ Molly O’Neill has said, “Half of Boulud is a big-city executive the other half is a shy, fastidious Frenchman who cooked his way off his family’s farm to the apex of his craft.” He began at Le Cirque in 1983, but a decade later had started his eponymous restaurant (with a $2 million loan from the CEO of Playtex), by many considered to be the finest in town (others say Le Bernardin). By November 1993, he’d already received four stars from the Times’ Marian Burros. When he moved Daniel from the location that currently holds Café Boulud in 1998, Ruth Reichl was quick to reassure us about the new location: “How’s the food? Do you really need to ask? If you were a fan of Daniel, you know what to expect: First-rate French food from a talented chef at the peak of his powers.” Typical main courses include roasted skate with arugula, “heirloom” tomatoes, black olives, saffron potatoes, and a fennel-tomato emulsion and roasted rack of lamb with a lemon-rosemary crust, grilled radicchio, honey-glazed eggplant, and a sweet garlic panisse, a french fry made with chickpea puree.

10. Rector’s
9. 21 Club
8. Restaurant at the Waldorf-Astoria
7. Barbetta
6. Coach House
5. Lutece
4. Delmonico’s
3. Bank Coffee House
2. Daniel
1. Le Pavillon


Explore fresh, Island-inspired cuisine

Inspired by the bounty of land and sea, our award-winning chefs create distinctive menus for each of our restaurants, offering you an array of dining options, from breakfast to dessert. Set the mood for your evening with nightly musical entertainment and graceful hula performances.

Enjoy casual al fresco fare at House Without A Key, take in the ocean view from the open-air dining room at Orchids, or indulge in fine dining at our AAA Five Diamond and Forbes Five Star restaurant, La Mer. Savor bespoke craft cocktails and elevated wine at L’Aperitif, Lewers Lounge, and Cattleya Wine Bar. For your convenience, Halekulani Bakery & Restaurant provides relaxed all-day dining and “grab and go” delicacies.

La Mer

Treat yourself to refined dining with an ocean view at La Mer. Savor the delights of an internationally acclaimed menu inspired by the traditions of French cuisine and the flavors of Hawaii, complemented by an extensive wine selection. Hawaii’s only dual awarded restaurant (AAA Five Diamond status for three consecutive decades, and the only Forbes Travel Guide Five Star restaurant in Hawaii) La Mer embodies elegance and romance.

Orchids

A view of Waikiki Beach pairs naturally with the coastal Italian-inspired cuisine of Orchids. Breakfast, lunch and dinner include vegetarian options and choices ranging from light fare to hearty dishes, highlighting local produce and fresh seafood. Dine in the casually elegant oceanfront setting that makes Orchids a perennial favorite of locals and our return guests, especially for our celebrated Sunday Brunch and classic Afternoon Tea.

House Without A Key

Immortalized in literature, House Without A Key is one of the most iconic restaurants in Waikiki, famed for nightly Hawaiian music and hula performances with the over century-old kiawe tree as its backdrop. The informal open-air and outdoor seating arrangements create a relaxed, fresh atmosphere for breakfast, lunch or dinner. Enjoy the new brick oven, viewing kitchen, and newly designed poolside bar or settle in with one of our signature Mai Tais in hand and watch the glow of sunset over the sea.


Watch the video: Paris Cafe Ambience Mellow Morning Paris Coffee Shop Sounds, Jazz Music for Studying, Work, Relax (September 2021).