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Minneapolis’s Top 6 Bike-Friendly Eateries

Minneapolis’s Top 6 Bike-Friendly Eateries



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As one of the first American cities to have organized bicycle trails, Minneapolis is now considered to be one of the top bicycling cities in the nation. With more than 160 miles of on-street and off-street bike trails, lanes, and paths, this mode of transportation is a practical choice for many locals and tourists alike.

Given the high traffic, it’s only natural that plenty of cafés, restaurants, bars, and even bike shops both embrace and feed this biking culture. Some simply serve delicious coffees and pastries, while others offer larger menus for any meal of the day. In any case, all of these locations both accommodate and encourage a biking lifestyle.

  1. The Angry Catfish Bicycle Shop + Coffee Bar
    A "full service repair facility with state-of-the-art tools and a professional, knowledgeable staff prepared to service any make of bicycle," The Angry Catfish offers visitors a tune up and an espresso. They use a variety of brewing methods (including airpot, pour-over, Chemex, syphon, and French press) and prioritize direct trade in their sourcing. They also get their tasty baked goods from The Baker's Wife, a nearby bakery. It’s a good place to stop when on a ride by Lake Nokomis and need a fix (whether the caffeine kind or the greasy wrench kind).
  2. One on One
    One on One is located in the Northloop/Warehouse District near downtown. They source their organic coffee beans from nearby B&W Coffee and buy their milk and cream from Castle Rock Organic Farms (a short drive away in Wisco). They serve daily soups, sandwiches, cookies, and pastries. In addition to the café, they have a basement filled with quality used bike parts, and pride themselves on being able to "build, fix, adjust, or sometimes replace just about anything bicycle related."
  3. Common Roots Café
    Located in Uptown, Common Roots Café serves what they consider to be "good food made from scratch" with high-quality, local, organic, and fair-trade ingredients. They have a Common Room that’s free to rent for nonprofit organizations and community groups, as well as many repurposed materials (like lighting fixtures and exterior planters) from local universities and hospitals. Including bike-friendly parking, they serve brunch, bakery, sandwich, dinner, and wine and beer (there’s also a gluten-free menu). The lamb rillettes including grass-fed lamb pâté, crostini, cornichons, and citrus marmalade catches our eye.
  4. Tao Natural Foods
    Another Uptown spot, Tao Natural Foods is a health food store and café that accommodates bikers while offering a range of health services (integrative health coaching, therapeutic massage, acupuncture, Ayurvedic medicine, and Reiki). They cater to a variety of diets and also have a happy hour menu. This is a tasty place to go if going for a ride around the lakes, specifically Lake of the Isles.
  5. Birchwood Café
    Found in Seward with a lot of bike parking, Birchwood Café inhabits a location that was once a dairy and a neighborhood grocery. They support many local food businesses from the Twin Cities area, in addition to organizing an actual bike team that offers riders of all levels to participate. They serve breakfast, lunch, dinner, and weekend brunch with delicious features including a skyr plate and Surly and Maple Pork Belly Benedict. It’s close to both the Greenway and the river bike trial.
  1. Bryant-Lake Bowl
    The Bryant-Lake Bowl is a bowling alley/bar/restaurant/performance space. In addition to accommodating guests on their bikes, they promote safe biking by offering guests who wear their helmets a reduced price for beer. They serve appetizers, sandwiches, breakfast, salads, entrées, and a gluten-free menu. It’s close to both the Greenway trail and Bryant Avenue, which has a super-bike lane that's painted bright green and gives bikers the right of way.

Additional reporting provided by Andrew Meeker.


11 Exciting New Restaurants in Minneapolis and St. Paul Right Now, May 2021

Welcome back to an all-new version the Eater Twin Cities Heatmap, a collection of exciting new restaurants that have opened recently. Nothing has been normal in the past year plus thanks to the pandemic, but the hospitality industry, especially the industrious souls in Minneapolis and St. Paul, continue to find new, creative, and fun ways to serve fantastic food.

These are the restaurants of the moment, some brand new, some trying a new style, and some old favorites who have finally returned.

Fresh for May, we welcome Sidebar at Surdyk’s, Saint Dinette, Bar La Grassa, and Sea Salt. For now we say so long to Prieto, Stepchld, and Cafe Ceres, look for them in our neighborhood maps.

A number of Twin Cities restaurants and breweries have resumed indoor and outdoor service. However, this should not be taken as endorsement for dining, as there are still safety concerns: for updated information on coronavirus cases in your area, please visit the Minnesota Department of Health. Studies indicate that there is a lower exposure risk when outdoors, but the level of risk involved is contingent on restaurants following strict social distancing and other safety guidelines


5. 5-8 Club

Another other iconic eatery that serves the Juicy Lucy. Note the spelling difference. They've brought "i" into the mix, as it, "I need to get down there now that this burger craving has been activated." Both restaurants lay claim to the original cheese stuffed burger, but the main difference here is size. No one is leaving without big-time burger action at the 5-8, plus variety is king on this menu. . Opened at the peak of Prohibition, the 5-8 Club was a speak-easy. In the 50's the burger of note was introduced.


Monday thru Friday, 3:00 – 6:00 PM
Saturday / Sunday, Noon – 5:00 PM

Buy One, Get One For A BuckHalf Price Chef’s Choice OystersDollar Oysters Friday 3 – 6 PMSelect Appetizers $3 OffAll Sushi Rolls $13

Stella’s Fish Café & Prestige Oyster Bar
1400 West Lake Street
Minneapolis, MN 55408

Monday thru Thursday 11:30 AM – close
Friday thru Sunday 11:30 AM – close

ROOFTOP HOURS ARE DEPENDENT ON WEATHER

Monday thru Thursday 3:00 – 8:30 PM
Friday thru Sunday 11:30 AM – 8:30 PM

TAKEOUT ORDERS ARE UNLIMITED and can be made at any time in advance online.
*Menu Choices Subject To Change

Surcharge Notice

In order to maintain quality benefits for our employees along with rising restaurant expenditures,
Stella’s Fish Cafe will add a 3% surcharge to our guest checks. This is not an employee gratuity.


37 Comments

Great article, I will have to check out Sorrento Cucina.

My top 5:
1) Andrea Pizza – Highland Bank Building
2) Salad de Fusion – they don’t advertise this, but they make Bahn Mi sandwiches by request, Baker Building
3) Greek Grill – City Center
4) Restaurant Together – made to order sushi at take out prices, Highland Bank Building
5) Turtle Bread Company – One Financial Plaza

Not on skyway level but accessible by a stairway, Peter’s Grill at 8th St. and 2nd Ave S. is my downtown favorite. And great call on Brothers Deli. The deli buffet alone is worth the trip.

Great read, thanks for posting it! Those are all quality establishments no matter where you are!
Thankfully they’re right in our skyway!

Nick, I think the Greek Grill and the entire food court is gone from City Center. Sadly. But thank you for saying what building things are in, b/c streets mean nothing to me when I’m trying to find something in the skyway.

So, where is this Sorrento Cucina? What building is it in, and also helpful is what buildings are on either side?

Trieste is on the street level, but accessible via skyway. It’s in the Lumber Exchange building.

I’ll have to check out the secret bahn mi sandwiches at Salad de Fusion.

Greek Grill is definitely still open in City Center. It’s next to Baja Sol on the way to the Dorsey building (where Brothers and Chipotle are).

I went to Sorrento today for the first time and was not that impressed. Sure the portions are huge, but I thought the lasagna was rather bland and the cheese bread downright awful.

Jane, while the City Center’s food court is long gone, there are some food options on the Nicollet end of the second floor there. Greek Gril, Baja Sol, Au Bon Pain and Leeann Chin are your options there.

And while it’s not a skyway joint, the Skyroom on the 12th floor of the Macy’s building is an oft-overlooked lunch spot. Great options (giant salad bar, grill, deli, Mexican, Pasta) great prices and the best and brightest lunchtime view of downtown.

Go To Go is also not to be missed. It’s in the 5th street towers building I think, what used to be the Pilsbury building I think. Awesome kabob wraps – the lamb in particular is awesome. I’ll also second the Turtle Bread recommendation, great made to order sandwiches and the soup, of course, is also outstanding.

Go To Go is also not to be missed. It’s in the 5th street towers building I think, what used to be one of the Pilsbury buildings? Awesome kabob wraps – the lamb in particular is awesome. I’ll also second the Turtle Bread recommendation, great made to order sandwiches and the soup, of course, is also outstanding.

Nick – I’ll have to give Greek Grill another go. It wasn’t my favorite when I went – any recommendations? And I’ll definitely have to hit Salad de Fusion for a bahn mi.

Jane – Sorrento is in the Soo Line Building (5th St. and Marquette). It’s hard to explain how to get there (aren’t all skyway spots that way…), but from One Financial Plaza go northeast (turn into the skyway at the Caribou and keep going straight – don’t take the skyway on the left to Gavidae). Soo Line is the next building in the skyway between One Financial and the Qwest building. Don’t forget to stop at the Classic Cookie Co. while you’re over by the Qwest building.

Declan – Good To Go is another good option, as you said. Their hand tossed salads are really nice. It’s actually in the US Bank Plaza (former Pillsbury Center). The owners are the same as Atlas Grill owners.

Good picks. The faux bahn mi at Fusion is decent but hard to pony up $5 when I can ge the real thing for $2.50-3.50. Randa’s Deli on Lasalle makes a good gyro and Italian beef. Tea House by Kieran’s makes decent dumbed down Sichuan dishes to go. Taste of Thailand in the Warehouse has decent Thai.

Good to Go has nice salads & kabobs, slightly overpriced.
Greek Grill has some nice
Asian Gourmet in the Tri-Metro building on 2nd ave & 5th street does a passable version of Bi-Bim-Bap and some nice healthy-ish chinese entrees.
Sorrento is bleh.
Turtle Bread is a nice soup option.

Allie’s in the Rand Tower is fantastic. Soup, salads, sandwiches, packaged veggie trays, etc. All soup is from scratch, the owners are service-minded and the prices are right.

Good to Go has nice salads & kabobs, slightly overpriced.
Greek Grill is VG.
Asian Gourmet in the Tri-Metro building on 2nd ave & 5th street does a passable version of Bi-Bim-Bap and some nice healthy-ish chinese entrees.
Sorrento is bleh.
Turtle Bread is a nice soup option.

@Katie: I’ve always just had the Gyro with salad at Greek Grill. I really like their pita, but it’s by no means the best gyro I’ve ever had. I think it’s interesting that all of your suggestions are north of 7th Street. Do you work towards that end of downtown? Although it does seem to me that the quality and uniqueness of skyway lunch options does degrade as you go south towards Target HQ.

@dave: I’ll have to try the one at Randa’s — that’s the convenience store in the Highland Bank building, right? Agreed about $5 being too much for a Banh Mi, but what else is edible downtown for less than $5?

@geoff: I haven’t had Allie’s for lunch, but their scones are amazing for breakfast. They have dozens of kinds made fresh.

I also have enjoyed the Mock Duck Pad Thai at Sawatdee’s skyway location.

if you really want your Minneapolis workplace street/skyway lunch options to look inadequate, check this:

Good picks! Royal Orchid at 6th & Marquette: service is great and food is better I think than Satwatdee. There is an odd odor that you need to confront in the waiting line, but once you’re on the other side it’s not an issue.

For the Scandihoovians: Brother’s Deli has pickled herring at the salad bar : )

Funny you mention the odor.

I brought some Royal Orchid back to the office one day and my boss asked, “is that from the place in the North Star building skyway that smells like fried asshole?”, and I haven’t gone back since.

Where is Salad De Fusion- I can’t find any evidence of them online.

I’ll never eat at “au bon pain” aka “au bon mouse” ever again after the pictures that I saw circulate via email through all of the major compaines downtwon earlier this summer. nasty!

The German Hot Dog Company in the TCF building is an interesting place – I’m also a HUGE fan of the walkin’ dog in the secret food cout in Highland Bank Court – that place is legit!

@artsy, Salad De Fusion is in the Baker Bldg. between Caribou and Sawadee.

Always walk by never been. They have pictures on Banh Mi in their window. Also, they need a better menu board (font, color size of type) e.g., Zen Box.

@downtowner – before I get reemed a new one – Walkin Dog is in Norhstar Center!

Walking Dog smells like the americanized version of royal orchid. If you stand in the right spot by the escalator in North Star, you can smell both.

Walking Dog smells like the americanized version of royal orchid. If you stand in the right spot by the escalator in North Star, you can smell both.

Also, I think it’s spelled Salade de Fusion, which may be troubling your search. Their Bahn Mi isn’t inedible, but it makes me wish I worked closer to University or Eat Street.

German Hot Dog Company? Is that a new place? Sounds like a must.

the German Hot Dog Company is sweet – although the team that runs the place is clearly not of German descent.

The german hot dog itself is a hot dog sized brat – topped with sauerkraut.

They alos have a solid breakfast.

It’s across the hall from Ah Sa Wan (Oh So Good)

geoff. I am a long supporter of Royal Orchid so are a lot of others. I think your comment is down right destructive and nasty. I always happy with my meal there. If you bought something you think is bad, you should have called them for a refund. They are cheerful to give you a refund if you would bring the food back.

We should all be constructive rather than being the opposite.
All vendors are trying hard to gain our business, so a little kindness to them would help them to provide us with a better foods and without destructive comments. I am sure they would appreciate a good deal from all of us.

While not “fine dining” of any sort, the German Hotdog Stand certainly does rock! While not a top lunch spot for me, it serves quite possibly the best breakfast burrito in the Skyway. That’s right folks, burritos and dogs from the Germans. Wie Gehts! If anyone knows it by it’s pseudonym, the Shanty, then we’re probably friends. Located in TCF, you all should go tomorrow AM.

Thanks, Pat Smith! If I recall correctly, Royal Orchid was one of the very first Thai places in Mpls (used to be on Nicollet by 15th), and deserves the tip of a hat for the herculean effort of getting Minnesotans to eat green curry or fish sauce. My guess is the smell is something more akin to shrimp paste than anything related to ones backside.

morchella’s correct. The Royal Orchid was indeed one of the first Thai restaurants to introduce the wonderful flavors of Thailand to the Twin Cities. RO paved the way for current Thai darlings like True Thai, Roat Ocha, Raum Mit. Owners/siblings Nida and Pat are two of the hardest working people in this highly competitive, low margin niche. They may not be as splashy as other local restauranteurs, but they are more committed to the authenticity of their food than most.

I think I will have to disagree with the authenticity on Royal Orchid. Go order their Green Papaya Salad and tell me what you think. The one I ordered was the opposite of authentic. Too bad as this dish defines what is unique in Thai cuisine. The guy behind the counter actually admitted they use lime juice concentrate squeezed from a bottle. The Indian crowd seems to love their fried rice though…but now that good Indian food is available at Kabobs I think Royal Orchid is going to have a tough time.

ate at sorrento cucina today (quite by accident), had the spinach lasagne, which was ok, but holy portion size! i tend to get lunch and then pick away at it, and it took me over 2 hours to finish. probably won’t be a regular there. i’ve eaten at the german hot dog a few times, good breakfast sandwich (plus, no styrofoam box!). i do like zen box, avoid the noodles and get a bento skinny (shredded cabbage). the curry is quite good as well, as are the rolls (2 or 3 for $1.60, always very fresh). i sometimes hit leanne chins (fried rice and sesame chicken or potstickers), but that gets a bit too heavy to have every day. potbelly sometimes (but more for dinner).

anyone tried that sushi place across from salad de fusion? they used to be good, but i had some rolls there recently that must’ve been days old. sad. (the people were still very friendly, which makes me even more sad when i walk by there with my lunch from somewhere else…)

I love eating down town. I went for a long walk today throught the skyway and discovered a BUNCH of places I had never seen before. I am going to try India Express tomorrow, as it looked and smelled awesome!

I love brothers deli for their bulgogi sandwich mmmmmm

Not in the skyway, but right on 9th & Nicollet is an great Crepe place that has really reasonable prices and delicious food.


Family Fun

From 54 foot high rollercoasters in a mall to over 160 parks in the city.

Put away the cell phones and video games. We have better ways to play. Spend all day cruising and splashing at the Mall of America or playing mini golf the Sculpture Garden. Pack a picnic and head to Minnehaha Falls. Take a beach day at Bde Maka Ska. Cheer on your favorite team in our spectacular new stadiums. Catch a play at the renowned Children’s Theatre. Or get hands-on at the Science Museum. This is family fun defined the Minneapolis way.

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      Visit These Top Twin Cities Parks

      Minnehaha Park

      Courtesy Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board

      Throughout the Twin Cities, you can explore more than 50 parks and nature reserves across the metro. Some will have you leaning down to peer more closely at a flower others will have you working up a sweat on the beach volleyball courts and still more will connect you with nature as you walk, jog or bike along miles of paved trails.

      As you’ll find during your exploration, Minneapolis’ and St. Paul’s current rankings as the No. 1 and No. 2 park systems in the country are well deserved. And with parks in Minneapolis, St. Paul and the surrounding suburbs hosting outdoor movies and concerts, there’s even more reason why these are some of our favorite spots to spend the summer.

      MINNEAPOLIS

      The Chain of Lakes in Uptown is always buzzing with people on nice-weather days, particularly Lake Calhoun, also known as Bde Maka Ska. With a perfect circumference for 5K runners, the largest of the five connected lakes has three beaches, the Minneapolis Sailing School, volleyball courts and park areas. If you want a bit of history, on the southwest side of the lake is the Bakken Museum, an interactive museum for science and technology housed in a historic mansion with landscaped grounds.

      All of the lakes in the Chain of Lakes are connected via trails, too, so you can make your way to Brownie Lake, Cedar Lake, Lake of the Isles and Lake Harriet. Bird and flower lovers should make their way to Lake Harriet, while visitors with furry friends can enjoy the Lyndale Farmstead off-leash dog park or Lake of the Isles’ off-leash dog park.

      One of the best things about Minneapolis’ top parks and green spaces is they all offer something different. Minnehaha Falls is a beautiful 53-foot waterfall nestled in South Minneapolis, a mere half-mile walk from the 50th St.-Minnehaha light rail station. The rushing waters amid a backdrop of miniature bluff and rock make for one of the city’s most popular photo spots, but people are also drawn to the park’s many other amenities.

      The Longfellow House, Princess Depot and John H. Stevens House (fun fact: the latter was pulled by about 10,000 school children when it moved to Minnehaha Park in 1896) make up the three historic sites in the park. Perhaps more popular is a newer structure, the Sea Salt Eatery. Three separate lines for food, drinks and ice cream keep everything moving on the busy summer days. The park also contains three gardens, a bandstand, biking path, disc golf course, wading pool and more.

      On the east side of downtown is Gold Medal Park and its neighbor, Mill Ruins Park. Gold Medal Park isn’t the largest park in the Twin Cities, but its location makes for a perfect summertime break while you’re out and about in the city. Bordered by the Guthrie Theater, the Mississippi River and Izzy’s Ice Cream, the park is often filled with people lounging in the sun, eating frozen treats and walking their dogs.

      A half mile past the Guthrie, through the Central Mississippi Riverfront Regional Park, is Mill Ruins Park, which is the fallen-down testament to Minneapolis’ former title as the Milling Capital of the World. While you walk through the area on your own, consider downloading the Mill Ruins Quest Activity Guide from the Minneapolis Parks website or stopping at the Mill City Museum to learn more about city’s past.

      On the northeast part of Lake Harriet is Lyndale Park Garden with its four themed areas and the Thomas Sadler Roberts Bird Sanctuary. The most well known is perhaps the Rose Garden, which showcases more than 100 different rose varieties on 1.5 acres. Pedestrians appreciate the beauty of the flowers, and history lovers relish the fact that it is the second oldest public rose garden in the United States.

      The three other themed gardens are the Annual-Perennial Garden, the Butterfly and Hummingbird & Perennial and Border Gardens, and the Peace Garden. As one might guess, the Butterfly and Hummingbird & Perennial and Border Gardens offers one of your best bets to see flitting pollinators. In the Peace Garden rests “The Spirit of Peace,” a bronze origami crane sculpture by local artist Caprice Glaser that is, officially, an International Peace Site. Also in the garden is a bridge, a series of sculptures, and rocks and small conifers that evoke feelings of calm and balance.

      For potentially the biggest swath of green space in Minneapolis, look no further than Theodore Wirth Park. The park covers more than 740 acres, which includes almost 83 acres of water, two golf courses, trails and gardens. Common activities in the summer include disc golf, fishing and biking. Just a year ago, the 14,000-square-foot Trailhead opened with amenities that include a Cajun-themed restaurant and a full-service bike shop, but the gem of the park is still the Eloise Butler Wildflower Garden and Bird Sanctuary.

      Spanning 13 acres, Eloise Butler’s paths invite you to wander along its forest, wetland and prairie areas. For flowers, you’ll see the tail end of the Lady Slipper blossoms, irises and cardinals flowers in July, and after that, you’ll see sunflowers, white and purple asters, and the tall columns of blazing stars and goldenrods. Just outside the garden is a beach, picnic shelter and more hiking trails if you want to make a day of it—after all, there’s plenty to do in Theodore Wirth.

      For more options in Minneapolis, check out Lake Nokomis, which includes a beach and a delectable hot dog stand called Sandcastle Tower Hill Park, where you can see the tower that inspired Bob Dylan’s “All Along the Watchtower” and Loring Park, the downtown site for many festivals year round.

      Harriet Island Park

      Courtesy Visit Saint Paul

      Located a little east outside of downtown St. Paul is the Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary. The 29-acre park is a relatively new endeavor it has only been open to the public since 2005. Before that, the community, several organizations and the city had to work for decades to restore the original prairie, oak savanna and floodplain forest buried under industrialism’s effects. Now a stream runs through it, and you can spot wildlife at the sandstone bluffs and the two ponds. Interpretive signs help the Native American history of the park stay alive as well. As you walk among the 2,000-plus trees that volunteers planted, you can see for yourself: The vision for Bruce Vento may still be evolving, but this park will only get better with time.

      One of the most defining traits about this 450-acre park in northwestern St. Paul is its proximity to the Como Park Zoo & Conservatory, a free zoological garden with local and exotic animals a 100-plus-year-old conservatory with Japanese garden, orchid room and palm dome and a small amusement park (with a nominal admission fee). Even without that feature, though, every day you can find people drawn to the park’s green grasses, pond and pavilion, and golf course. At the pavilion is a seasonal cafe, a stage that hosts music performances and nearby boat rentals.

      Fort Snelling State Park covers more than 2,000 acres of land and is one of the most visited state parks in Minnesota. Its presence stretches to the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport and the border of the Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge, where it is easily accessed via the Metro Blue Line light rail or car. Once you get there, take time to explore the 18 miles of hiking trails and five miles of biking trails which connect to the 53-mile long Grand Rounds Scenic Bikeway. GPS locators, fishing poles and birding kits are all available to check out for free from the Visitor Center as well. (If you’re a Minnesota resident, you can fish without a license, but if you’re not, you can purchase one at dnr.state.mn.us.) As for the birds, some of the common ones that are found in the summer are the blue-winged teal duck, great blue heron, great egret, red-tailed hawk, the killdeer with its striped face and neck, and multiple species of woodpeckers.

      If you hike north, you’ll find your way to the Historic Fort Snelling (but you can also drive to it). In 2018, the Minnesota Historical Society began enacting its plan to revitalize not only the fort’s historic programming but its buildings as well. The fort is perhaps most known for its role in the US-Dakota War of 1862, but over the years, many have passed through its land, including Native Americans, fur traders and slaves. With new experiences, demonstrations and displays, you can now learn a more complete history of the land and the fort.

      Along the Mississippi River is Harriet Island Park (above), another smaller park nestled in the heart of the city. While it’s no longer an island—in 1950 the backchannel was filled in to connect it to the shore—you’ll still get a nice walk along the water. The island is named after Harriet Bishop, the city’s first public school teacher, and over the years, its amenities have changed as the activity around and the health of the Mississippi River have changed. Now, the park has a pavilion for concerts and serves as the takeoff point of Padelford River Cruises.

      Irvine Park, just west of downtown St. Paul, is yet another small but picturesque space within one of the city’s historic neighborhoods. It is the most popular park for outdoor weddings in St. Paul, so don’t be too surprised if you see one during your visit—it seems people can’t help falling in love with (and at) the park’s gazebo and fountain. If the weather is nice, meander through the residential streets around the park to see some of St. Paul’s most stately and historic Victorian mansions.

      While significantly smaller than Como Regional Park, the two-acre Mears Park in downtown St. Paul has its own charm. In 1993, the architect Brad J. Goldberg redesigned the park so it could meet the needs of the community with a performing pavilion, a plaza, benches bordering the flowers and trees, and a trickling stream. In addition to the Music in Mears Park concert series, which goes through the end of August, the free Lowertown Blues and Funk Festival is held July 19 and 20 this year. Surrounding Mears Park are eateries like St. Dinette, Handsome Hog (“Top Chef” Justin Sutherland’s first restaurant) and the Bulldog Lowertown, and just a few blocks away is CHS Field, home of the St. Paul Saints baseball team.

      For more options in St. Paul, check out Off-Leash Arlington Arkwright Dog Park to spend a day exploring multiple terrains with your dog the Mississippi National River and Recreation Area for gorgeous hiking among the shoreline and bluffs and Raspberry Island, an island accessible by car bridge on the Mississippi River.

      Minnesota Landscape Arboretum

      SUBURB SPOTLIGHTS

      At Centennial Lakes in Edina await more than 10 acres of park and water. In the winter, the park is filled with ice skaters gliding across the frozen pond, while the summer brings just as many visitors to its lapping shores. With a North, Central and South area, there is so much to do here. Depending on where you are in the park, you can rent boats, go fishing, wander a hedge maze, or put your skills to the test with a putting course, croquet and lawn bowling. As you make your way through the park, don’t forget to stop and smell the flowers peeking out from the various gardens, and take a break on a swinging bench and enjoy the view. Summers also bring free cultural performances Monday through Thursday as well as movies on Thursday evenings.

      One of the many parks on the east side of the Twin Cities is Central Park in Roseville. This park breaks down into six different sections: One has a nature center, others have sports fields, and some have picnic shelters and playgrounds. One, Central Park – North, is described as an “undeveloped oasis of nature” where you can walk among the quiet woods and wetland of Minnesota.

      Lebanon Hills Regional Park in Eagan is another massive park in the Twin Cities with more than 20 miles of hiking trails, 11 miles of mountain biking trails and almost 10 miles of equestrian trails. More than seven lakes populate the park, giving way to a beach, fishing piers and boat launches. Five trailheads and a visitor center make it easy to orient yourself during your adventure. While all of the parks offer nature and activity programs, Lebanon’s includes parent-child canoe and kayak classes, puppet shows, and survivalist classes.

      The 1,200-acre grounds in Chaska include a plethora of gardens, habitats and plant collections, with public art scattered throughout as well. A favorite family feature is the PlantMaker Studio at the Learning Center, which hosts activities for children on the weekends from noon to 4 p.m. Through July, activities center around roots and the unseen underground world of plants, and in August and September, the activities focus on the power of scent using herbs. Also included in admission are free guided walking tours (and with such a big place to roam, no tours are the same) or, for $5, an hour-long guided tram tour.

      There are plenty of places to get outside and enjoy nature in the suburbs, and one of the largest swathes of land is the Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge. With access points in cities like Bloomington, Burnsville and Chaska, the wildlife refuge’s 14,000 acres spans across southern and western parts of the metro. Along the hiking trails, you might spot animals like wood ducks and river otters while you explore the floodplain forests, tallgrass prairies and wetlands. To help you explore, you can download the free Discover Minnesota Valley Game for nature trivia, Discover Nature Virtual Sign for guidance, or iNaturalist to help you identify the plants and animals around you.

      For flowers and formal landscaping, head to Noerenberg Memorial Gardens along Lake Minnetonka. Standout flowers include daylilies, azaleas and ornamental shade trees. The pagoda looking out over the water is always picture perfect, and the paved paths send you ambling under the pergola or toward blooming shrubs.


      Ingredients

      Step 1

      Preheat oven to 400°. Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until very al dente, about 2 minutes less than package directions. Drain and set aside.

      Step 2

      Meanwhile, heat oil in a large Dutch oven or large high-sided skillet over medium. Add leeks season with a couple pinches of salt. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender and golden around the edges, 6–8 minutes. Uncover and add anchovies, garlic, red pepper flakes, and several grinds of black pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until anchovies are disintegrated and garlic is tender, about 5 minutes.

      Step 3

      Add cream and 3 oz. Parmesan. Bring to a simmer season with salt and black pepper (it should taste a bit salty because the pasta will absorb some seasoning as it bakes). Add peas and reserved pasta and toss gently to coat top with more Parmesan. Transfer pasta to oven bake until top is crisp and cream is bubbling around the edges, 25–30 minutes. Let cool slightly before serving.

      How would you rate Baked Pasta and Leeks With Anchovy Cream?

      Rinse your anchovies in a mesh strainer. It’ll reduce your salt content without sacrificing flavor.

      Just as delicious with just a dash of cream, 1/2 lemon juice, lemon zest, and 1/2 amount of anchovy!

      I mean yum, but why the hell does the pic look more red sauce when this is a v white sauce pasta? Y’all got me confused looking at my dish like. where did I miss the mark?

      This was so so good. Added some sausage cause we could. Insane. Great leftovers for lunch.

      I took the suggestion to add pasta water due to the ɽry' comments. Added 1c to the sauce and baked for 15' covered. It was fantastic! Not dry at all and pasta still had tooth feel. I also added a little lemon zest, which was nice. Lemon juice is probably a good idea, or something acidic to cut the richness. Definitely will make it again.

      Absolutely delicious but needs a healthy squeeze of lemon before serving. Other than that A+.

      This. was. AMAZING. The best pasta dish I've ever made. It's much more than the sum of its parts — the finished product was not at all fishy or overly salty (and I'm sensitive to too much salt). It has a delicate flavor that's much more subtle and refined than a tuna casserole I wouldn't even compare the two in terms of flavor. I followed the directions to a T, but skipped coating it in a second layer of parm, and only kept it in the oven for 15 minutes. It didn't get a crispy top in that time (I baked it in a dutch oven), but that doesn't really matter to me.

      This is the tuna casserole of the 70’s, but delicious! My only quibble is the current trend of recipes with instructions to cook the pasta first, sometimes saying to reserve some pasta water,. Pasta should never wait for the sauce. Sauce should always wait for the pasta. So, cook the sauce, then boil the pasta and add it (along with any water clinging to it) directly to the saucepan.

      Made it as-is except baked for only 15 minutes. Easy and delicious! The family came back for seconds.

      The amount of sauce with the pasta seemed a bit suspect. I reserved 1 cup of the pasta water so added that in before putting this dish in the oven. It definitely helped, although the top of the dish was still a bit dry. Additionally, this dish reminded me of a gussied up tuna helper - not a bad thing, just a funny similarity to that childhood hot dish.

      I totally agree with Sue c but 3 stars is much to high.

      Turned out fantastic. The anchovies with garlic combination were the right amount of salty and savoury.

      Made it. Loved it. Family liked the dish, perfect for Lent, perfect for my budget. Thank you!

      Sorry, should be 3 stars. I made the recipe as written. It was all good until the baking. I found baking at such a high temp for 20-25 mins. dried out the dish. The sauce practically disappeared - and I didn't even use the full 1 lb. of pasta! If I were to alter the recipe, it would be to either bake for the same time at 350, or 400 degrees for 15-20 mins - either way keep an eye on it while it bakes and remove when the sauce begins to bubble. As for the taste, it was okay. It reminded me of a creamed tuna fish & peas dish that my mom used to make when I was a kid.


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