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19 Facts About Diet Soda That Might Make You Finally Stop Drinking It

19 Facts About Diet Soda That Might Make You Finally Stop Drinking It

The health risks are greater than you think

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Green tea, whole juices and coconut water are all healthy drinks perfect for midday sipping. But when you’re searching for a drink with a bit of caffeine to give you a boost for the day, you might be tempted to reach for a diet soda, believing it to be a healthier choice than coffee or sugary colas.

Yes, diet soda has zero calories. And yes, it’s an inexpensive and tasty way to get your caffeine fix. Headaches, cravings, mood swings and more are the results of drinking diet soda too frequently. Here are some facts that might make you rethink your drink of choice.

Artificial sweeteners in diet soda can trigger headaches

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Many diet sodas are sweetened with aspartame, an artificial sweetener that is sweeter than sugar. New flavors of Diet Coke released in 2018 are sweetened with “Ace-K,” a controversial sweetener that tastes 200 times sweeter than regular refined sugar. Some studies have linked the sweeteners in diet soda to headaches, suggesting they might trigger the pain. And studies have also shown that people who consume foods with artificial sweeteners are more likely to shun healthier food options for other artificially flavored food and are twice as likely to be obese compared to people who didn’t drink diet soda.

Diet soda can cause breakouts

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Diet soda has been linked to depression

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In a study conducted by the National Institutes of Health, a survey of 263,925 adults nationwide indicated a correlation between the consumption of diet soda and a higher chance of a depression diagnosis. Soda drinkers overall were 30% more likely to be depressed, and diet soda added another 22% of risk into the equation.

Diet soda drinkers have a lower bone density

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In a 2006 study, it was concluded that women who drank diet soda had significantly lower bone mineral density than those who abstained. Low bone mineral density can set you up for osteoporosis, a disease that causes bones to become weak and brittle. Trade in the diet soda for foods like Brussel sprouts and sweet potatoes, both of which keep your bones healthy and strong.

Diet soda could interfere with your gut health

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Gut health is important. The healthier your gut, the healthier your digestive tract. And the healthier your digestive tract, the easier it is for your body to properly digest food. But a study published in the scientific journal Nature revealed that diet soda may disrupt your gut health. Your gut has a balance of "good" and "bad" bacteria. According to the study, the artificial sweeteners that are included in diet soda may alter the type and function of the bacteria in your gut microbiome.

Drinking diet soda increases your risk of metabolic syndrome and diabetes

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Diet soda mixed with alcohol gets you drunker than a sugary cocktail would

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Even if you’re worried about calories, you may not want to opt for a diet soda as a mixer in your favorite cocktail. A diet soda mixed with any sort of spirit is likely to get you drunker than the liquor would when combined with a different mixer. Studies show that alcoholic drinks mixed with diet soda results in higher blood alcohol concentrations. The sugar used in regular sweet drinks, like soda, slows down the absorption of alcohol in the bloodstream. The artificial sweeteners used in diet soda don’t have this effect.

Drinking diet soda can interfere with your sense of taste

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Increased consumption of diet soda can interfere with your sense of taste, according to an fMRI study conducted by researchers at San Diego University. Twenty-four diet soda and non-diet soda drinkers were given intermittent sips of sugar water and artificially sweetened water and asked to rank the drink’s enjoyability. The brain’s reaction to both drinks among diet soda drinkers was nearly identical, meaning their brain’s reward system was incapable of differentiating between sugar and artificial sweeteners.

Drinking diet soda puts you at high risk for hypertension

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Diet soda drinkers may be more likely to experience high blood pressure compared to those who avoid the beverage, according to a study out of Brazil. Adolescents from 20 public schools were examined to investigate the correlation between diet soda consumption and high blood pressure. Researchers were able to conclude that adolescents who drank diet soda had a higher blood pressure than those who drank non-diet soft drinks or no soda at all. So, even if you enjoy the foods and drinks that help lower blood pressure, like bananas and pistachios, your best bet is to avoid diet soda at all costs.

Drinking too much diet soda could be bad for your kidneys

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According to the National Kidney Foundation, diet soda could be bad news for your kidneys. One study determined that women who drank several diet sodas a day showed a significant decline in kidney function.

Diet soda makes your brain experience effects similar to chemical addiction

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It’s not in your head — there’s a biological addictive response to drinking diet soda. Dopamine and glutamate, two neurotransmitters in the brain’s reward center, are released after you take a sip of the caffeine and aspartame that are in the drink. To put it simply, the chemicals in diet soda convince your brain to crave it over and over to feel the same sense of joy you did when you had it previously.

Drinking diet soda doesn’t always equate to weight loss

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Just because it’s calorie free doesn’t mean it’s an effective weight-loss tool. A study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found that diet soda drinkers age 65 and older gained triple the abdominal fat compared to their peers who didn’t consume the drink.

Just one diet soda a day boosts your risk of a heart attack

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A University of Miami study found that regularly drinking diet soda can significantly escalate your risk of a heart attack. Regular soda drinkers who opted for the sugary drink instead did not have as strong a risk. You might be better off with the sugary soda — or, hear us out, water.

Pregnant women’s consumption of diet soda may cause overweight children

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A study published in JAMA Pediatrics examined more than 3,000 pregnant women and their infant children one year after birth. Mothers who drank diet soda were two times more likely to have obese and overweight children.

Diet soda drinkers’ teeth can be just as eroded as those of chemical drug addicts

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According to a case study published in the journal General Dentistry, the mouth of one habitual diet soda consumer was just as eroded as the mouths of a methamphetamine user. The highly acidic nature of diet soda erodes the teeth and wears away at tooth enamel when dental hygiene isn’t a priority. Soda is just one of the many foods and drinks dentists won’t touch.

Too much diet soda has been linked to neurological disorders

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Diet soda raises your risk of stroke

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In the same study from Boston University, research also suggested that people who drank at least one diet soda per day were three times as likely to develop stroke. Neurologists recommend these foods for brain health.

Diet soda has been linked to premature death

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A study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine found that consumers who favored artificially sweetened drinks — like diet soda — were 26% more likely to die prematurely compared to others who seldom drank sugar-free beverages.

Over time, diet soda can cause your skin and muscles to wither

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Dangerous Health Fads People (Still) Aren’t Aware Of

In 1885, Doctor Pepper was invented in America, followed by Coca-Cola in 1886 and Pepsi-Cola in 1898. As the consumption of sodas started to increase over the next few decades, so did the rates of obesity, diabetes, and other related health problems.

In the 1950s, diet sodas were invented as an alternative to soda for those with diabetes. Later, when people started becoming calorie conscious, diet sodas were marketed as a zero calorie alternative for health-conscious consumers. There was just one problem: diet sodas are anything but healthy.

Diet sodas were initially sweetened with cyclamate, which was banned by the FDA in the 1970s over evidence that cyclamates caused cancer. In 1983, the FDA approved the use of aspartame in diet sodas, despite earlier testimony that aspartame was linked to brain damage. Some of the health issues linked to diet sodas in general include headaches, greater chance of depression, diabetes, lower bone density, hypertension, decline in kidney function, greater risk of heart attack, aging skin, pregnancy risks, tooth decay, and a greater risk of stroke.

Thankfully, the general public appears to finally be catching on, as both soda and diet soda consumption are now in decline. But this trend wasn’t the result of any major public health awareness campaign. Instead, people are finally realizing the health risks of sodas despite the lack of information (as well as misinformation) they have been given over the years.

We live in a society where large corporations put profits over everything else, including consumer safety. Big business can also easily influence the government, the news media, and “scientific” research. Therefore, it shouldn’t be surprising that diet sodas are not the only “health” trend that the public has been mislead about. Below are similar unhealthy habits and products that have been pushed onto consumers. Many people still aren’t aware of the dangers.


Dangerous Health Fads People (Still) Aren’t Aware Of

In 1885, Doctor Pepper was invented in America, followed by Coca-Cola in 1886 and Pepsi-Cola in 1898. As the consumption of sodas started to increase over the next few decades, so did the rates of obesity, diabetes, and other related health problems.

In the 1950s, diet sodas were invented as an alternative to soda for those with diabetes. Later, when people started becoming calorie conscious, diet sodas were marketed as a zero calorie alternative for health-conscious consumers. There was just one problem: diet sodas are anything but healthy.

Diet sodas were initially sweetened with cyclamate, which was banned by the FDA in the 1970s over evidence that cyclamates caused cancer. In 1983, the FDA approved the use of aspartame in diet sodas, despite earlier testimony that aspartame was linked to brain damage. Some of the health issues linked to diet sodas in general include headaches, greater chance of depression, diabetes, lower bone density, hypertension, decline in kidney function, greater risk of heart attack, aging skin, pregnancy risks, tooth decay, and a greater risk of stroke.

Thankfully, the general public appears to finally be catching on, as both soda and diet soda consumption are now in decline. But this trend wasn’t the result of any major public health awareness campaign. Instead, people are finally realizing the health risks of sodas despite the lack of information (as well as misinformation) they have been given over the years.

We live in a society where large corporations put profits over everything else, including consumer safety. Big business can also easily influence the government, the news media, and “scientific” research. Therefore, it shouldn’t be surprising that diet sodas are not the only “health” trend that the public has been mislead about. Below are similar unhealthy habits and products that have been pushed onto consumers. Many people still aren’t aware of the dangers.


Dangerous Health Fads People (Still) Aren’t Aware Of

In 1885, Doctor Pepper was invented in America, followed by Coca-Cola in 1886 and Pepsi-Cola in 1898. As the consumption of sodas started to increase over the next few decades, so did the rates of obesity, diabetes, and other related health problems.

In the 1950s, diet sodas were invented as an alternative to soda for those with diabetes. Later, when people started becoming calorie conscious, diet sodas were marketed as a zero calorie alternative for health-conscious consumers. There was just one problem: diet sodas are anything but healthy.

Diet sodas were initially sweetened with cyclamate, which was banned by the FDA in the 1970s over evidence that cyclamates caused cancer. In 1983, the FDA approved the use of aspartame in diet sodas, despite earlier testimony that aspartame was linked to brain damage. Some of the health issues linked to diet sodas in general include headaches, greater chance of depression, diabetes, lower bone density, hypertension, decline in kidney function, greater risk of heart attack, aging skin, pregnancy risks, tooth decay, and a greater risk of stroke.

Thankfully, the general public appears to finally be catching on, as both soda and diet soda consumption are now in decline. But this trend wasn’t the result of any major public health awareness campaign. Instead, people are finally realizing the health risks of sodas despite the lack of information (as well as misinformation) they have been given over the years.

We live in a society where large corporations put profits over everything else, including consumer safety. Big business can also easily influence the government, the news media, and “scientific” research. Therefore, it shouldn’t be surprising that diet sodas are not the only “health” trend that the public has been mislead about. Below are similar unhealthy habits and products that have been pushed onto consumers. Many people still aren’t aware of the dangers.


Dangerous Health Fads People (Still) Aren’t Aware Of

In 1885, Doctor Pepper was invented in America, followed by Coca-Cola in 1886 and Pepsi-Cola in 1898. As the consumption of sodas started to increase over the next few decades, so did the rates of obesity, diabetes, and other related health problems.

In the 1950s, diet sodas were invented as an alternative to soda for those with diabetes. Later, when people started becoming calorie conscious, diet sodas were marketed as a zero calorie alternative for health-conscious consumers. There was just one problem: diet sodas are anything but healthy.

Diet sodas were initially sweetened with cyclamate, which was banned by the FDA in the 1970s over evidence that cyclamates caused cancer. In 1983, the FDA approved the use of aspartame in diet sodas, despite earlier testimony that aspartame was linked to brain damage. Some of the health issues linked to diet sodas in general include headaches, greater chance of depression, diabetes, lower bone density, hypertension, decline in kidney function, greater risk of heart attack, aging skin, pregnancy risks, tooth decay, and a greater risk of stroke.

Thankfully, the general public appears to finally be catching on, as both soda and diet soda consumption are now in decline. But this trend wasn’t the result of any major public health awareness campaign. Instead, people are finally realizing the health risks of sodas despite the lack of information (as well as misinformation) they have been given over the years.

We live in a society where large corporations put profits over everything else, including consumer safety. Big business can also easily influence the government, the news media, and “scientific” research. Therefore, it shouldn’t be surprising that diet sodas are not the only “health” trend that the public has been mislead about. Below are similar unhealthy habits and products that have been pushed onto consumers. Many people still aren’t aware of the dangers.


Dangerous Health Fads People (Still) Aren’t Aware Of

In 1885, Doctor Pepper was invented in America, followed by Coca-Cola in 1886 and Pepsi-Cola in 1898. As the consumption of sodas started to increase over the next few decades, so did the rates of obesity, diabetes, and other related health problems.

In the 1950s, diet sodas were invented as an alternative to soda for those with diabetes. Later, when people started becoming calorie conscious, diet sodas were marketed as a zero calorie alternative for health-conscious consumers. There was just one problem: diet sodas are anything but healthy.

Diet sodas were initially sweetened with cyclamate, which was banned by the FDA in the 1970s over evidence that cyclamates caused cancer. In 1983, the FDA approved the use of aspartame in diet sodas, despite earlier testimony that aspartame was linked to brain damage. Some of the health issues linked to diet sodas in general include headaches, greater chance of depression, diabetes, lower bone density, hypertension, decline in kidney function, greater risk of heart attack, aging skin, pregnancy risks, tooth decay, and a greater risk of stroke.

Thankfully, the general public appears to finally be catching on, as both soda and diet soda consumption are now in decline. But this trend wasn’t the result of any major public health awareness campaign. Instead, people are finally realizing the health risks of sodas despite the lack of information (as well as misinformation) they have been given over the years.

We live in a society where large corporations put profits over everything else, including consumer safety. Big business can also easily influence the government, the news media, and “scientific” research. Therefore, it shouldn’t be surprising that diet sodas are not the only “health” trend that the public has been mislead about. Below are similar unhealthy habits and products that have been pushed onto consumers. Many people still aren’t aware of the dangers.


Dangerous Health Fads People (Still) Aren’t Aware Of

In 1885, Doctor Pepper was invented in America, followed by Coca-Cola in 1886 and Pepsi-Cola in 1898. As the consumption of sodas started to increase over the next few decades, so did the rates of obesity, diabetes, and other related health problems.

In the 1950s, diet sodas were invented as an alternative to soda for those with diabetes. Later, when people started becoming calorie conscious, diet sodas were marketed as a zero calorie alternative for health-conscious consumers. There was just one problem: diet sodas are anything but healthy.

Diet sodas were initially sweetened with cyclamate, which was banned by the FDA in the 1970s over evidence that cyclamates caused cancer. In 1983, the FDA approved the use of aspartame in diet sodas, despite earlier testimony that aspartame was linked to brain damage. Some of the health issues linked to diet sodas in general include headaches, greater chance of depression, diabetes, lower bone density, hypertension, decline in kidney function, greater risk of heart attack, aging skin, pregnancy risks, tooth decay, and a greater risk of stroke.

Thankfully, the general public appears to finally be catching on, as both soda and diet soda consumption are now in decline. But this trend wasn’t the result of any major public health awareness campaign. Instead, people are finally realizing the health risks of sodas despite the lack of information (as well as misinformation) they have been given over the years.

We live in a society where large corporations put profits over everything else, including consumer safety. Big business can also easily influence the government, the news media, and “scientific” research. Therefore, it shouldn’t be surprising that diet sodas are not the only “health” trend that the public has been mislead about. Below are similar unhealthy habits and products that have been pushed onto consumers. Many people still aren’t aware of the dangers.


Dangerous Health Fads People (Still) Aren’t Aware Of

In 1885, Doctor Pepper was invented in America, followed by Coca-Cola in 1886 and Pepsi-Cola in 1898. As the consumption of sodas started to increase over the next few decades, so did the rates of obesity, diabetes, and other related health problems.

In the 1950s, diet sodas were invented as an alternative to soda for those with diabetes. Later, when people started becoming calorie conscious, diet sodas were marketed as a zero calorie alternative for health-conscious consumers. There was just one problem: diet sodas are anything but healthy.

Diet sodas were initially sweetened with cyclamate, which was banned by the FDA in the 1970s over evidence that cyclamates caused cancer. In 1983, the FDA approved the use of aspartame in diet sodas, despite earlier testimony that aspartame was linked to brain damage. Some of the health issues linked to diet sodas in general include headaches, greater chance of depression, diabetes, lower bone density, hypertension, decline in kidney function, greater risk of heart attack, aging skin, pregnancy risks, tooth decay, and a greater risk of stroke.

Thankfully, the general public appears to finally be catching on, as both soda and diet soda consumption are now in decline. But this trend wasn’t the result of any major public health awareness campaign. Instead, people are finally realizing the health risks of sodas despite the lack of information (as well as misinformation) they have been given over the years.

We live in a society where large corporations put profits over everything else, including consumer safety. Big business can also easily influence the government, the news media, and “scientific” research. Therefore, it shouldn’t be surprising that diet sodas are not the only “health” trend that the public has been mislead about. Below are similar unhealthy habits and products that have been pushed onto consumers. Many people still aren’t aware of the dangers.


Dangerous Health Fads People (Still) Aren’t Aware Of

In 1885, Doctor Pepper was invented in America, followed by Coca-Cola in 1886 and Pepsi-Cola in 1898. As the consumption of sodas started to increase over the next few decades, so did the rates of obesity, diabetes, and other related health problems.

In the 1950s, diet sodas were invented as an alternative to soda for those with diabetes. Later, when people started becoming calorie conscious, diet sodas were marketed as a zero calorie alternative for health-conscious consumers. There was just one problem: diet sodas are anything but healthy.

Diet sodas were initially sweetened with cyclamate, which was banned by the FDA in the 1970s over evidence that cyclamates caused cancer. In 1983, the FDA approved the use of aspartame in diet sodas, despite earlier testimony that aspartame was linked to brain damage. Some of the health issues linked to diet sodas in general include headaches, greater chance of depression, diabetes, lower bone density, hypertension, decline in kidney function, greater risk of heart attack, aging skin, pregnancy risks, tooth decay, and a greater risk of stroke.

Thankfully, the general public appears to finally be catching on, as both soda and diet soda consumption are now in decline. But this trend wasn’t the result of any major public health awareness campaign. Instead, people are finally realizing the health risks of sodas despite the lack of information (as well as misinformation) they have been given over the years.

We live in a society where large corporations put profits over everything else, including consumer safety. Big business can also easily influence the government, the news media, and “scientific” research. Therefore, it shouldn’t be surprising that diet sodas are not the only “health” trend that the public has been mislead about. Below are similar unhealthy habits and products that have been pushed onto consumers. Many people still aren’t aware of the dangers.


Dangerous Health Fads People (Still) Aren’t Aware Of

In 1885, Doctor Pepper was invented in America, followed by Coca-Cola in 1886 and Pepsi-Cola in 1898. As the consumption of sodas started to increase over the next few decades, so did the rates of obesity, diabetes, and other related health problems.

In the 1950s, diet sodas were invented as an alternative to soda for those with diabetes. Later, when people started becoming calorie conscious, diet sodas were marketed as a zero calorie alternative for health-conscious consumers. There was just one problem: diet sodas are anything but healthy.

Diet sodas were initially sweetened with cyclamate, which was banned by the FDA in the 1970s over evidence that cyclamates caused cancer. In 1983, the FDA approved the use of aspartame in diet sodas, despite earlier testimony that aspartame was linked to brain damage. Some of the health issues linked to diet sodas in general include headaches, greater chance of depression, diabetes, lower bone density, hypertension, decline in kidney function, greater risk of heart attack, aging skin, pregnancy risks, tooth decay, and a greater risk of stroke.

Thankfully, the general public appears to finally be catching on, as both soda and diet soda consumption are now in decline. But this trend wasn’t the result of any major public health awareness campaign. Instead, people are finally realizing the health risks of sodas despite the lack of information (as well as misinformation) they have been given over the years.

We live in a society where large corporations put profits over everything else, including consumer safety. Big business can also easily influence the government, the news media, and “scientific” research. Therefore, it shouldn’t be surprising that diet sodas are not the only “health” trend that the public has been mislead about. Below are similar unhealthy habits and products that have been pushed onto consumers. Many people still aren’t aware of the dangers.


Dangerous Health Fads People (Still) Aren’t Aware Of

In 1885, Doctor Pepper was invented in America, followed by Coca-Cola in 1886 and Pepsi-Cola in 1898. As the consumption of sodas started to increase over the next few decades, so did the rates of obesity, diabetes, and other related health problems.

In the 1950s, diet sodas were invented as an alternative to soda for those with diabetes. Later, when people started becoming calorie conscious, diet sodas were marketed as a zero calorie alternative for health-conscious consumers. There was just one problem: diet sodas are anything but healthy.

Diet sodas were initially sweetened with cyclamate, which was banned by the FDA in the 1970s over evidence that cyclamates caused cancer. In 1983, the FDA approved the use of aspartame in diet sodas, despite earlier testimony that aspartame was linked to brain damage. Some of the health issues linked to diet sodas in general include headaches, greater chance of depression, diabetes, lower bone density, hypertension, decline in kidney function, greater risk of heart attack, aging skin, pregnancy risks, tooth decay, and a greater risk of stroke.

Thankfully, the general public appears to finally be catching on, as both soda and diet soda consumption are now in decline. But this trend wasn’t the result of any major public health awareness campaign. Instead, people are finally realizing the health risks of sodas despite the lack of information (as well as misinformation) they have been given over the years.

We live in a society where large corporations put profits over everything else, including consumer safety. Big business can also easily influence the government, the news media, and “scientific” research. Therefore, it shouldn’t be surprising that diet sodas are not the only “health” trend that the public has been mislead about. Below are similar unhealthy habits and products that have been pushed onto consumers. Many people still aren’t aware of the dangers.