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FDA Halts Orange Juice Imports

FDA Halts Orange Juice Imports

They've found traces of a chemical fungicide not approved in the US

Most imports of orange juice are being held at the border by the FDA, after they found trace levels of an unapproved chemical fungicide called carbendazim in orange juice coming from Brazil. Today, the FDA cleared Canadian imports of orange juice and will release the shipments after the results are finalized.

The FDA is reportedly stepping up testing, holding shipments at the border, and planning on spot-checking juices in grocery stores to see how widespread the problem is.

Coca-Cola tipped off the FDA about the fungicide, saying the Brazilian growers sprayed carbendazim on their orange trees; the chemical has not been approved for use in citrus in the U.S.

However, officials say the amount of carbendazim is not a public health risk, as the amount is lower than the approved level in Europe.

Carbendazim reportedly helps fight black spot, a fungus on the fruit which doesn't affect taste or crop. Studies have linked the chemical to a higher risk of liver tumors in animals.

The Daily Byte is a regular column dedicated to covering interesting food news and trends across the country. Click here for previous columns.


FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

1.12.12 8:15 AM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Determined not to let orange juice double as unintentional contraception, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has frozen shipments to check for carbendazim, a fungicide banned in much of the world that is believed to cause infertility. As much as 25 percent of the American juice supply comes from abroad, and the FDA acted on a report that a juice company detected the fungicide in imports from Brazil, which provides 11 percent of America’s OJ.

According to CNNMoney, the testing process will take five to 10 business days. If the FDA spots any carbendazim, it will turn the shipments away or destroy them. In order to speed things along, the FDA will let companies with three consecutive clean shipments off the hook for further testing.

Don’t flip out and throw all your juice away. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the level of carbendazim found in the initial report were not high enough to put consumers in danger.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

1.12.12 8:15 AM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Determined not to let orange juice double as unintentional contraception, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has frozen shipments to check for carbendazim, a fungicide banned in much of the world that is believed to cause infertility. As much as 25 percent of the American juice supply comes from abroad, and the FDA acted on a report that a juice company detected the fungicide in imports from Brazil, which provides 11 percent of America’s OJ.

According to CNNMoney, the testing process will take five to 10 business days. If the FDA spots any carbendazim, it will turn the shipments away or destroy them. In order to speed things along, the FDA will let companies with three consecutive clean shipments off the hook for further testing.

Don’t flip out and throw all your juice away. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the level of carbendazim found in the initial report were not high enough to put consumers in danger.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

1.12.12 8:15 AM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Determined not to let orange juice double as unintentional contraception, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has frozen shipments to check for carbendazim, a fungicide banned in much of the world that is believed to cause infertility. As much as 25 percent of the American juice supply comes from abroad, and the FDA acted on a report that a juice company detected the fungicide in imports from Brazil, which provides 11 percent of America’s OJ.

According to CNNMoney, the testing process will take five to 10 business days. If the FDA spots any carbendazim, it will turn the shipments away or destroy them. In order to speed things along, the FDA will let companies with three consecutive clean shipments off the hook for further testing.

Don’t flip out and throw all your juice away. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the level of carbendazim found in the initial report were not high enough to put consumers in danger.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

1.12.12 8:15 AM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Determined not to let orange juice double as unintentional contraception, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has frozen shipments to check for carbendazim, a fungicide banned in much of the world that is believed to cause infertility. As much as 25 percent of the American juice supply comes from abroad, and the FDA acted on a report that a juice company detected the fungicide in imports from Brazil, which provides 11 percent of America’s OJ.

According to CNNMoney, the testing process will take five to 10 business days. If the FDA spots any carbendazim, it will turn the shipments away or destroy them. In order to speed things along, the FDA will let companies with three consecutive clean shipments off the hook for further testing.

Don’t flip out and throw all your juice away. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the level of carbendazim found in the initial report were not high enough to put consumers in danger.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

1.12.12 8:15 AM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Determined not to let orange juice double as unintentional contraception, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has frozen shipments to check for carbendazim, a fungicide banned in much of the world that is believed to cause infertility. As much as 25 percent of the American juice supply comes from abroad, and the FDA acted on a report that a juice company detected the fungicide in imports from Brazil, which provides 11 percent of America’s OJ.

According to CNNMoney, the testing process will take five to 10 business days. If the FDA spots any carbendazim, it will turn the shipments away or destroy them. In order to speed things along, the FDA will let companies with three consecutive clean shipments off the hook for further testing.

Don’t flip out and throw all your juice away. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the level of carbendazim found in the initial report were not high enough to put consumers in danger.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

1.12.12 8:15 AM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Determined not to let orange juice double as unintentional contraception, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has frozen shipments to check for carbendazim, a fungicide banned in much of the world that is believed to cause infertility. As much as 25 percent of the American juice supply comes from abroad, and the FDA acted on a report that a juice company detected the fungicide in imports from Brazil, which provides 11 percent of America’s OJ.

According to CNNMoney, the testing process will take five to 10 business days. If the FDA spots any carbendazim, it will turn the shipments away or destroy them. In order to speed things along, the FDA will let companies with three consecutive clean shipments off the hook for further testing.

Don’t flip out and throw all your juice away. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the level of carbendazim found in the initial report were not high enough to put consumers in danger.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

1.12.12 8:15 AM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Determined not to let orange juice double as unintentional contraception, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has frozen shipments to check for carbendazim, a fungicide banned in much of the world that is believed to cause infertility. As much as 25 percent of the American juice supply comes from abroad, and the FDA acted on a report that a juice company detected the fungicide in imports from Brazil, which provides 11 percent of America’s OJ.

According to CNNMoney, the testing process will take five to 10 business days. If the FDA spots any carbendazim, it will turn the shipments away or destroy them. In order to speed things along, the FDA will let companies with three consecutive clean shipments off the hook for further testing.

Don’t flip out and throw all your juice away. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the level of carbendazim found in the initial report were not high enough to put consumers in danger.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

1.12.12 8:15 AM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Determined not to let orange juice double as unintentional contraception, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has frozen shipments to check for carbendazim, a fungicide banned in much of the world that is believed to cause infertility. As much as 25 percent of the American juice supply comes from abroad, and the FDA acted on a report that a juice company detected the fungicide in imports from Brazil, which provides 11 percent of America’s OJ.

According to CNNMoney, the testing process will take five to 10 business days. If the FDA spots any carbendazim, it will turn the shipments away or destroy them. In order to speed things along, the FDA will let companies with three consecutive clean shipments off the hook for further testing.

Don’t flip out and throw all your juice away. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the level of carbendazim found in the initial report were not high enough to put consumers in danger.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

1.12.12 8:15 AM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Determined not to let orange juice double as unintentional contraception, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has frozen shipments to check for carbendazim, a fungicide banned in much of the world that is believed to cause infertility. As much as 25 percent of the American juice supply comes from abroad, and the FDA acted on a report that a juice company detected the fungicide in imports from Brazil, which provides 11 percent of America’s OJ.

According to CNNMoney, the testing process will take five to 10 business days. If the FDA spots any carbendazim, it will turn the shipments away or destroy them. In order to speed things along, the FDA will let companies with three consecutive clean shipments off the hook for further testing.

Don’t flip out and throw all your juice away. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the level of carbendazim found in the initial report were not high enough to put consumers in danger.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

FDA Puts Squeeze On Orange Juice Shipments, Checks For Fungicide

1.12.12 8:15 AM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Determined not to let orange juice double as unintentional contraception, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has frozen shipments to check for carbendazim, a fungicide banned in much of the world that is believed to cause infertility. As much as 25 percent of the American juice supply comes from abroad, and the FDA acted on a report that a juice company detected the fungicide in imports from Brazil, which provides 11 percent of America’s OJ.

According to CNNMoney, the testing process will take five to 10 business days. If the FDA spots any carbendazim, it will turn the shipments away or destroy them. In order to speed things along, the FDA will let companies with three consecutive clean shipments off the hook for further testing.

Don’t flip out and throw all your juice away. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the level of carbendazim found in the initial report were not high enough to put consumers in danger.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


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